Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Randomized controlled trial of community-based dancing to modify disease progression in Parkinson disease.
Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2012 Feb; 26(2):132-43.NN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tango dancing has been effective in improving measures of physical function in people with Parkinson disease (PD). However, all previous studies were institution-based, tested participants on medication, and employed short-term interventions.

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of a 12-month community-based tango program for individuals with PD on disease severity and physical function.

METHODS

Sixty-two participants were randomly assigned to a twice weekly, community-based Argentine Tango program or a Control group (no intervention). Participants were assessed off anti-Parkinson medication at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (MDS-UPDRS-3). Secondary outcome measures were the MDS-UPDRS-1, MDS-UPDRS-2, MiniBESTest balance test; Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG_Q); 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT); gait velocity for comfortable forward, fast as possible forward, dual task, and backward walking; and Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT).

RESULTS

Groups were not different at baseline. Overall, the Tango group improved whereas the Control group showed little change on most measures. For the MDS-UPDRS-3, there was no significant change in the Control group from baseline to 12 months, whereas the Tango group had a reduction of 28.7% (12.8 points). There were significant group by time interactions for MDS-UPDRS-3, MiniBESTest, FOG_Q, 6MWT, forward and dual task walking velocities, and 9HPT in favor of the dance group.

CONCLUSIONS

Improvements in the Tango group were apparent off medication, suggesting that long-term participation in tango may modify progression of disability in PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21959675

Citation

Duncan, Ryan P., and Gammon M. Earhart. "Randomized Controlled Trial of Community-based Dancing to Modify Disease Progression in Parkinson Disease." Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 26, no. 2, 2012, pp. 132-43.
Duncan RP, Earhart GM. Randomized controlled trial of community-based dancing to modify disease progression in Parkinson disease. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2012;26(2):132-43.
Duncan, R. P., & Earhart, G. M. (2012). Randomized controlled trial of community-based dancing to modify disease progression in Parkinson disease. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 26(2), 132-43. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968311421614
Duncan RP, Earhart GM. Randomized Controlled Trial of Community-based Dancing to Modify Disease Progression in Parkinson Disease. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2012;26(2):132-43. PubMed PMID: 21959675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Randomized controlled trial of community-based dancing to modify disease progression in Parkinson disease. AU - Duncan,Ryan P, AU - Earhart,Gammon M, Y1 - 2011/09/29/ PY - 2011/10/1/entrez PY - 2011/10/1/pubmed PY - 2012/5/23/medline SP - 132 EP - 43 JF - Neurorehabilitation and neural repair JO - Neurorehabil Neural Repair VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tango dancing has been effective in improving measures of physical function in people with Parkinson disease (PD). However, all previous studies were institution-based, tested participants on medication, and employed short-term interventions. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a 12-month community-based tango program for individuals with PD on disease severity and physical function. METHODS: Sixty-two participants were randomly assigned to a twice weekly, community-based Argentine Tango program or a Control group (no intervention). Participants were assessed off anti-Parkinson medication at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (MDS-UPDRS-3). Secondary outcome measures were the MDS-UPDRS-1, MDS-UPDRS-2, MiniBESTest balance test; Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG_Q); 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT); gait velocity for comfortable forward, fast as possible forward, dual task, and backward walking; and Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT). RESULTS: Groups were not different at baseline. Overall, the Tango group improved whereas the Control group showed little change on most measures. For the MDS-UPDRS-3, there was no significant change in the Control group from baseline to 12 months, whereas the Tango group had a reduction of 28.7% (12.8 points). There were significant group by time interactions for MDS-UPDRS-3, MiniBESTest, FOG_Q, 6MWT, forward and dual task walking velocities, and 9HPT in favor of the dance group. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in the Tango group were apparent off medication, suggesting that long-term participation in tango may modify progression of disability in PD. SN - 1552-6844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21959675/Randomized_controlled_trial_of_community_based_dancing_to_modify_disease_progression_in_Parkinson_disease_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1545968311421614?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -