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Use of complementary and alternative medicine among US adults with and without functional limitations.
Disabil Rehabil. 2012; 34(2):128-35.DR

Abstract

PURPOSE

This study characterizes the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among adults with and without functional limitations. We also examine the reasons for using CAM and for disclosing its use to conventional medical professionals.

METHODS

Data were obtained from the 2007 adult CAM supplement and components of the National Health Interview Survey (n = 20,710).

RESULTS

Adults with functional limitations used CAM more frequently than those without (48.7% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). Adults with functional limitations used mind-body therapies the most (27.4%) and alternative medical systems the least (4.8%). Relaxation techniques were the most common therapy used by adults with functional limitations, and they used it more often than those without limitations (24.6% vs. 13.7%; P < 0.001). More than half of the adults with functional limitations (51.3%) discussed CAM use with conventional medical professionals, compared with 37.9% of adults without limitations (p < 0.001). The main reason for CAM use was general wellness/disease prevention among adults with and without functional limitations (59.8% vs. 63.1%; P = 0.051).

CONCLUSIONS

CAM use among adults with functional limitations is high. Health practitioners should screen for and discuss the safety and efficacy of CAM when providing health care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Public Health Surveillance Program Office, Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. COkoro@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21962229

Citation

Okoro, Catherine A., et al. "Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among US Adults With and Without Functional Limitations." Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 34, no. 2, 2012, pp. 128-35.
Okoro CA, Zhao G, Li C, et al. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among US adults with and without functional limitations. Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(2):128-35.
Okoro, C. A., Zhao, G., Li, C., & Balluz, L. S. (2012). Use of complementary and alternative medicine among US adults with and without functional limitations. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(2), 128-35. https://doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2011.591887
Okoro CA, et al. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among US Adults With and Without Functional Limitations. Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(2):128-35. PubMed PMID: 21962229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of complementary and alternative medicine among US adults with and without functional limitations. AU - Okoro,Catherine A, AU - Zhao,Guixiang, AU - Li,Chaoyang, AU - Balluz,Lina S, Y1 - 2011/09/30/ PY - 2011/10/4/entrez PY - 2011/10/4/pubmed PY - 2012/4/27/medline SP - 128 EP - 35 JF - Disability and rehabilitation JO - Disabil Rehabil VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: This study characterizes the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among adults with and without functional limitations. We also examine the reasons for using CAM and for disclosing its use to conventional medical professionals. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 2007 adult CAM supplement and components of the National Health Interview Survey (n = 20,710). RESULTS: Adults with functional limitations used CAM more frequently than those without (48.7% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). Adults with functional limitations used mind-body therapies the most (27.4%) and alternative medical systems the least (4.8%). Relaxation techniques were the most common therapy used by adults with functional limitations, and they used it more often than those without limitations (24.6% vs. 13.7%; P < 0.001). More than half of the adults with functional limitations (51.3%) discussed CAM use with conventional medical professionals, compared with 37.9% of adults without limitations (p < 0.001). The main reason for CAM use was general wellness/disease prevention among adults with and without functional limitations (59.8% vs. 63.1%; P = 0.051). CONCLUSIONS: CAM use among adults with functional limitations is high. Health practitioners should screen for and discuss the safety and efficacy of CAM when providing health care. SN - 1464-5165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21962229/Use_of_complementary_and_alternative_medicine_among_US_adults_with_and_without_functional_limitations_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2011.591887 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -