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Symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai sample.
J Med Assoc Thai. 2011 Sep; 94(9):1141-9.JM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) has been used on both normal and clinical samples in Thailand over a long period. However, its validity and reliability have not yet been systemically reported

OBJECTIVE

Survey the validity and reliability of SCL-90 in a more extensive way, using a normal sample of people throughout Thailand, and investigate the psychometric properties of the Thai version of SCL-90.

MATERIAL AND METHOD

Four hundred forty eight subjects participated in the present study of which 50.4% were male and with ages ranging from eighteen to 90 years, by providing demographic data and completing the Thai version of SCL-90 and the 16-Personality Factor (16-PF) Questionnaire. The demographic data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, and Cronbach's alpha was used to determine its internal consistency Factor and confirmatory factor analysis were performed to construct the validity, and convergent and discriminant validities were calculated to generate Pearson's correlation coefficients using the 16-PF subscales.

RESULTS

The mean of the global symptoms index was found to be 0.70 +/- 0.46, with the means of the symptoms ranging from 0.53 for Psychoticism to 0.98 for Obsessive-compulsive disorder. We found to be a significant difference in sub-scales across genders, age groups, geographic regions, educational levels, occupations, and incomes, but the symptom dimension patterns revealed were similar to those of previous studies. Depression and anxiety were the key components to show variance between the normal and clinical samples. The measurements demonstrated good internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha, at 0.97, but did not yield relevant correlations between some of the 16-PF sub-scales, as was expected. Moreover, factor analysis revealed that SCL-90 has a uni-dimensional construct.

CONCLUSION

The Thai version of SCL-90 showed a good internal consistency, but poor discriminant validity with most items occurring for the depression, anxiety and interpersonal sensitivity dimensions. It is recommended that some of the items be revised for clinical studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. tchanob@med.cmu.ac.thNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21970206

Citation

Wongpakaran, Tinakon, et al. "Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai Sample." Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, vol. 94, no. 9, 2011, pp. 1141-9.
Wongpakaran T, Wongpakaran N, Boripuntakul T. Symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai sample. J Med Assoc Thai. 2011;94(9):1141-9.
Wongpakaran, T., Wongpakaran, N., & Boripuntakul, T. (2011). Symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai sample. Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, 94(9), 1141-9.
Wongpakaran T, Wongpakaran N, Boripuntakul T. Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai Sample. J Med Assoc Thai. 2011;94(9):1141-9. PubMed PMID: 21970206.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptom checklist-90 (SCL-90) in a Thai sample. AU - Wongpakaran,Tinakon, AU - Wongpakaran,Nahathai, AU - Boripuntakul,Theerarat, PY - 2011/10/6/entrez PY - 2011/10/6/pubmed PY - 2011/11/9/medline SP - 1141 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet JO - J Med Assoc Thai VL - 94 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) has been used on both normal and clinical samples in Thailand over a long period. However, its validity and reliability have not yet been systemically reported OBJECTIVE: Survey the validity and reliability of SCL-90 in a more extensive way, using a normal sample of people throughout Thailand, and investigate the psychometric properties of the Thai version of SCL-90. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Four hundred forty eight subjects participated in the present study of which 50.4% were male and with ages ranging from eighteen to 90 years, by providing demographic data and completing the Thai version of SCL-90 and the 16-Personality Factor (16-PF) Questionnaire. The demographic data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, and Cronbach's alpha was used to determine its internal consistency Factor and confirmatory factor analysis were performed to construct the validity, and convergent and discriminant validities were calculated to generate Pearson's correlation coefficients using the 16-PF subscales. RESULTS: The mean of the global symptoms index was found to be 0.70 +/- 0.46, with the means of the symptoms ranging from 0.53 for Psychoticism to 0.98 for Obsessive-compulsive disorder. We found to be a significant difference in sub-scales across genders, age groups, geographic regions, educational levels, occupations, and incomes, but the symptom dimension patterns revealed were similar to those of previous studies. Depression and anxiety were the key components to show variance between the normal and clinical samples. The measurements demonstrated good internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha, at 0.97, but did not yield relevant correlations between some of the 16-PF sub-scales, as was expected. Moreover, factor analysis revealed that SCL-90 has a uni-dimensional construct. CONCLUSION: The Thai version of SCL-90 showed a good internal consistency, but poor discriminant validity with most items occurring for the depression, anxiety and interpersonal sensitivity dimensions. It is recommended that some of the items be revised for clinical studies. SN - 0125-2208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21970206/Symptom_checklist_90__SCL_90__in_a_Thai_sample_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-KRT7-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -