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Mimicking natural superhydrophobic surfaces and grasping the wetting process: a review on recent progress in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces.
Adv Colloid Interface Sci. 2011 Dec 12; 169(2):80-105.AC

Abstract

A typical superhydrophobic (ultrahydrophobic) surface can repel water droplets from wetting itself, and the contact angle of a water droplet resting on a superhydrophobic surface is greater than 150°, which means extremely low wettability is achievable on superhydrophobic surfaces. Many superhydrophobic surfaces (both manmade and natural) normally exhibit micro- or nanosized roughness as well as hierarchical structure, which somehow can influence the surface's water repellence. As the research into superhydrophobic surfaces goes deeper and wider, it is becoming more important to both academic fields and industrial applications. In this work, the most recent progress in preparing manmade superhydrophobic surfaces through a variety of methodologies, particularly within the past several years, and the fundamental theories of wetting phenomena related to superhydrophobic surfaces are reviewed. We also discuss the perspective of natural superhydrophobic surfaces utilized as mimicking models. The discussion focuses on how the superhydrophobic property is promoted on solid surfaces and emphasizes the effect of surface roughness and structure in particular. This review aims to enable researchers to perceive the inner principles of wetting phenomena and employ suitable methods for creation and modification of superhydrophobic surfaces.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Energy & Sustainability Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, UK. yuying.yan@nottingham.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21974918

Citation

Yan, Y Y., et al. "Mimicking Natural Superhydrophobic Surfaces and Grasping the Wetting Process: a Review On Recent Progress in Preparing Superhydrophobic Surfaces." Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 169, no. 2, 2011, pp. 80-105.
Yan YY, Gao N, Barthlott W. Mimicking natural superhydrophobic surfaces and grasping the wetting process: a review on recent progress in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces. Adv Colloid Interface Sci. 2011;169(2):80-105.
Yan, Y. Y., Gao, N., & Barthlott, W. (2011). Mimicking natural superhydrophobic surfaces and grasping the wetting process: a review on recent progress in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces. Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, 169(2), 80-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cis.2011.08.005
Yan YY, Gao N, Barthlott W. Mimicking Natural Superhydrophobic Surfaces and Grasping the Wetting Process: a Review On Recent Progress in Preparing Superhydrophobic Surfaces. Adv Colloid Interface Sci. 2011 Dec 12;169(2):80-105. PubMed PMID: 21974918.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mimicking natural superhydrophobic surfaces and grasping the wetting process: a review on recent progress in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces. AU - Yan,Y Y, AU - Gao,N, AU - Barthlott,W, Y1 - 2011/09/14/ PY - 2011/04/16/received PY - 2011/08/17/revised PY - 2011/08/27/accepted PY - 2011/10/7/entrez PY - 2011/10/7/pubmed PY - 2012/4/3/medline SP - 80 EP - 105 JF - Advances in colloid and interface science JO - Adv Colloid Interface Sci VL - 169 IS - 2 N2 - A typical superhydrophobic (ultrahydrophobic) surface can repel water droplets from wetting itself, and the contact angle of a water droplet resting on a superhydrophobic surface is greater than 150°, which means extremely low wettability is achievable on superhydrophobic surfaces. Many superhydrophobic surfaces (both manmade and natural) normally exhibit micro- or nanosized roughness as well as hierarchical structure, which somehow can influence the surface's water repellence. As the research into superhydrophobic surfaces goes deeper and wider, it is becoming more important to both academic fields and industrial applications. In this work, the most recent progress in preparing manmade superhydrophobic surfaces through a variety of methodologies, particularly within the past several years, and the fundamental theories of wetting phenomena related to superhydrophobic surfaces are reviewed. We also discuss the perspective of natural superhydrophobic surfaces utilized as mimicking models. The discussion focuses on how the superhydrophobic property is promoted on solid surfaces and emphasizes the effect of surface roughness and structure in particular. This review aims to enable researchers to perceive the inner principles of wetting phenomena and employ suitable methods for creation and modification of superhydrophobic surfaces. SN - 1873-3727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21974918/Mimicking_natural_superhydrophobic_surfaces_and_grasping_the_wetting_process:_a_review_on_recent_progress_in_preparing_superhydrophobic_surfaces_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0001-8686(11)00155-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -