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Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures.
Am J Trop Med Hyg 2011; 85(4):685-90AJ

Abstract

The most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis is Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is transmitted largely by consumption of snails/slugs. We previously identified cases of angiostrongyliasis that occurred in Hawaii from 2001 to 2005; the highest incidence was on the island of Hawaii. We now report symptoms, laboratory parameters, and exposures. Eighteen patients were evaluated; 94% had headache, and 65% had sensory symptoms (paresthesia, hyperesthesia, and/or numbness). These symptoms lasted a median of 17 and 55 days, respectively. Three persons recalled finding a slug in their food/drink. Case-patients on the island of Hawaii were more likely than case-patients on other islands to consume raw homegrown produce in a typical week (89% versus 0%, P < 0.001) and to see snails/slugs on produce (56% versus 0%, P = 0.03). Residents and travelers should be aware of the potential risks of eating uncooked produce in Hawaii, especially if it is from the island of Hawaii and locally grown.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. nhoch@bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21976573

Citation

Hochberg, Natasha S., et al. "Eosinophilic Meningitis Attributable to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection in Hawaii: Clinical Characteristics and Potential Exposures." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 85, no. 4, 2011, pp. 685-90.
Hochberg NS, Blackburn BG, Park SY, et al. Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011;85(4):685-90.
Hochberg, N. S., Blackburn, B. G., Park, S. Y., Sejvar, J. J., Effler, P. V., & Herwaldt, B. L. (2011). Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 85(4), pp. 685-90. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0322.
Hochberg NS, et al. Eosinophilic Meningitis Attributable to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection in Hawaii: Clinical Characteristics and Potential Exposures. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011;85(4):685-90. PubMed PMID: 21976573.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures. AU - Hochberg,Natasha S, AU - Blackburn,Brian G, AU - Park,Sarah Y, AU - Sejvar,James J, AU - Effler,Paul V, AU - Herwaldt,Barbara L, PY - 2011/10/7/entrez PY - 2011/10/7/pubmed PY - 2011/12/13/medline SP - 685 EP - 90 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 85 IS - 4 N2 - The most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis is Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is transmitted largely by consumption of snails/slugs. We previously identified cases of angiostrongyliasis that occurred in Hawaii from 2001 to 2005; the highest incidence was on the island of Hawaii. We now report symptoms, laboratory parameters, and exposures. Eighteen patients were evaluated; 94% had headache, and 65% had sensory symptoms (paresthesia, hyperesthesia, and/or numbness). These symptoms lasted a median of 17 and 55 days, respectively. Three persons recalled finding a slug in their food/drink. Case-patients on the island of Hawaii were more likely than case-patients on other islands to consume raw homegrown produce in a typical week (89% versus 0%, P < 0.001) and to see snails/slugs on produce (56% versus 0%, P = 0.03). Residents and travelers should be aware of the potential risks of eating uncooked produce in Hawaii, especially if it is from the island of Hawaii and locally grown. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21976573/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0322?crawler=true&amp;mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -