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An H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that invaded Japan through waterfowl migration.
Jpn J Vet Res. 2011 Aug; 59(2-3):89-100.JJ

Abstract

In 2010, an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) was isolated from feces of apparently healthy ducks migrating southward in Hokkaido, the northernmost prefecture of Japan. The H5N1 HPAIVs were subsequently detected in domestic and wild birds at multiple sites corresponding to the flyway of the waterfowl having stopovers in the Japanese archipelago. The Hokkaido isolate was genetically nearly identical to H5N1 HPAIVs isolated from swans in the spring of 2009 and 2010 in Mongolia, but less pathogenic in experimentally infected ducks than the 2009 Mongolian isolate. These findings suggest that H5N1 HPAIVs with relatively mild pathogenicity might be selected and harbored in the waterfowl population during the 2009-2010 migration seasons. Our data provide "early warning" signals for preparedness against the unprecedented situation in which the waterfowl reservoirs serve as perpetual sources and disseminators of HPAIVs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Global Epidemiology, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21977732

Citation

Kajihara, Masahiro, et al. "An H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus That Invaded Japan Through Waterfowl Migration." The Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 59, no. 2-3, 2011, pp. 89-100.
Kajihara M, Matsuno K, Simulundu E, et al. An H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that invaded Japan through waterfowl migration. Jpn J Vet Res. 2011;59(2-3):89-100.
Kajihara, M., Matsuno, K., Simulundu, E., Muramatsu, M., Noyori, O., Manzoor, R., Nakayama, E., Igarashi, M., Tomabechi, D., Yoshida, R., Okamatsu, M., Sakoda, Y., Ito, K., Kida, H., & Takada, A. (2011). An H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that invaded Japan through waterfowl migration. The Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research, 59(2-3), 89-100.
Kajihara M, et al. An H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus That Invaded Japan Through Waterfowl Migration. Jpn J Vet Res. 2011;59(2-3):89-100. PubMed PMID: 21977732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus that invaded Japan through waterfowl migration. AU - Kajihara,Masahiro, AU - Matsuno,Keita, AU - Simulundu,Edgar, AU - Muramatsu,Mieko, AU - Noyori,Osamu, AU - Manzoor,Rashid, AU - Nakayama,Eri, AU - Igarashi,Manabu, AU - Tomabechi,Daisuke, AU - Yoshida,Reiko, AU - Okamatsu,Masatoshi, AU - Sakoda,Yoshihiro, AU - Ito,Kimihito, AU - Kida,Hiroshi, AU - Takada,Ayato, PY - 2011/10/8/entrez PY - 2011/10/8/pubmed PY - 2011/11/10/medline SP - 89 EP - 100 JF - The Japanese journal of veterinary research JO - Jpn J Vet Res VL - 59 IS - 2-3 N2 - In 2010, an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) was isolated from feces of apparently healthy ducks migrating southward in Hokkaido, the northernmost prefecture of Japan. The H5N1 HPAIVs were subsequently detected in domestic and wild birds at multiple sites corresponding to the flyway of the waterfowl having stopovers in the Japanese archipelago. The Hokkaido isolate was genetically nearly identical to H5N1 HPAIVs isolated from swans in the spring of 2009 and 2010 in Mongolia, but less pathogenic in experimentally infected ducks than the 2009 Mongolian isolate. These findings suggest that H5N1 HPAIVs with relatively mild pathogenicity might be selected and harbored in the waterfowl population during the 2009-2010 migration seasons. Our data provide "early warning" signals for preparedness against the unprecedented situation in which the waterfowl reservoirs serve as perpetual sources and disseminators of HPAIVs. SN - 0047-1917 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21977732/An_H5N1_highly_pathogenic_avian_influenza_virus_that_invaded_Japan_through_waterfowl_migration_ L2 - http://www.medicalonline.jp/meteo_linkout.php?issn=0047-1917&volume=59&issue=2-3&spage=89 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -