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A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: a national survey of 1,427 women.
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 Oct 07; 11:85.BC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence indicates that people who reside in non-urban areas have a higher use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) than people who reside in urban areas. However, there is sparse research on the reasons for such differences. This paper investigates the reasons for geographical differences in CAM use by comparing CAM users from four geographical areas (major cities, inner regional, outer region, rural/remote) across a range of health status, healthcare satisfaction, neighbourhood and community factors.

METHODS

A cross-sectional survey of 1,427 participants from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) conducted in 2009.

RESULTS

The average total cost of consultations with CAM practitioners was $416 per annum and was highest for women in the major cities, declining with increasing distance from capital cities/remoteness (p < 0.001). The average total cost of self-prescribed CAM was $349 per annum, but this did not significantly differ across geographical areas. The increased use of CAM in rural and remote areas appears to be influenced by poorer access to conventional medical care (p < 0.05) and a greater sense of community (p < 0.05) amongst these rural and remote residents. In contrast to the findings of previous research this study found that health status was not associated with the differences in CAM use between urban and non-urban areas.

CONCLUSION

It appears that a number of factors influence the different levels of CAM use across the urban/non-urban divide. Further research is needed to help tease out and understand these factors. Such research will help support health care policy and practice with regards to this topic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Nursing Midwifery and Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. jon.adams@uts.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21981986

Citation

Adams, Jon, et al. "A Comparison of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users and Use Across Geographical Areas: a National Survey of 1,427 Women." BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 11, 2011, p. 85.
Adams J, Sibbritt D, Broom A, et al. A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: a national survey of 1,427 women. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011;11:85.
Adams, J., Sibbritt, D., Broom, A., Loxton, D., Pirotta, M., Humphreys, J., & Lui, C. W. (2011). A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: a national survey of 1,427 women. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11, 85. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-11-85
Adams J, et al. A Comparison of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users and Use Across Geographical Areas: a National Survey of 1,427 Women. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 Oct 7;11:85. PubMed PMID: 21981986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: a national survey of 1,427 women. AU - Adams,Jon, AU - Sibbritt,David, AU - Broom,Alex, AU - Loxton,Deborah, AU - Pirotta,Marie, AU - Humphreys,John, AU - Lui,Chi-Wai, Y1 - 2011/10/07/ PY - 2011/06/17/received PY - 2011/10/07/accepted PY - 2011/10/11/entrez PY - 2011/10/11/pubmed PY - 2011/12/28/medline SP - 85 EP - 85 JF - BMC complementary and alternative medicine JO - BMC Complement Altern Med VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that people who reside in non-urban areas have a higher use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) than people who reside in urban areas. However, there is sparse research on the reasons for such differences. This paper investigates the reasons for geographical differences in CAM use by comparing CAM users from four geographical areas (major cities, inner regional, outer region, rural/remote) across a range of health status, healthcare satisfaction, neighbourhood and community factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 1,427 participants from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) conducted in 2009. RESULTS: The average total cost of consultations with CAM practitioners was $416 per annum and was highest for women in the major cities, declining with increasing distance from capital cities/remoteness (p < 0.001). The average total cost of self-prescribed CAM was $349 per annum, but this did not significantly differ across geographical areas. The increased use of CAM in rural and remote areas appears to be influenced by poorer access to conventional medical care (p < 0.05) and a greater sense of community (p < 0.05) amongst these rural and remote residents. In contrast to the findings of previous research this study found that health status was not associated with the differences in CAM use between urban and non-urban areas. CONCLUSION: It appears that a number of factors influence the different levels of CAM use across the urban/non-urban divide. Further research is needed to help tease out and understand these factors. Such research will help support health care policy and practice with regards to this topic. SN - 1472-6882 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21981986/A_comparison_of_complementary_and_alternative_medicine_users_and_use_across_geographical_areas:_a_national_survey_of_1427_women_ L2 - https://bmccomplementalternmed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6882-11-85 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -