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Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among hospitalised patients: reported use of CAM and reasons for use, CAM preferred during hospitalisation, and the socio-demographic determinants of CAM users.
Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2011 Nov; 17(4):199-205.CT

Abstract

PURPOSE

This paper reports a study to examine hospitalised patients' frequency and patterns of CAM use, their reasons for CAM use, their preferences of CAMs during hospitalisation, and the association between patients' socio-demographic variables and use of each individual CAM/CAM domain.

METHODS

A convenience sample of 353 patients hospitalised in 19 surgical wards at four metropolitan hospitals completed a questionnaire on CAM use and socio-demographic variables.

RESULTS

The response rate was 73.5%, and over 90% of the sample acknowledged using CAMs. Non-herbal supplements (60.3%) and massage therapy (45%) were the most frequently used CAMs, with biologically based therapies (68.8%) as well as mind-body interventions (65.4%) being the most often used CAM domains. About 1 in 10 patients (9.6%) used CAMs from all five domains. With the exception of herbal-botanical therapies, self-prayer for health reasons/spiritual healing and music therapy, all CAMs were mainly used on an 'only when needed' basis. The most common reason nominated for using CAMs was that '[it] fits into my way of life/philosophy' (26%). The majority of patients declared interest in and support for the hospital providing CAMs. Patients were most inclined to choose therapies categorised as manipulative and body-based methods (65.4%) for use in hospital. Massage therapy (53.5%) and non-herbal supplements (43.1%) were the top two CAMs favoured for use in hospital. CAM use was also dependent of socio-demographic data (age, gender, marital status, place of residence, education level, religion, and income in hospitalised patients).

CONCLUSION

The use of CAMs is pervasive amongst surgical in-patients, making it feasible to initially assess these patients for CAM use and provide them with clinically approved CAMs where possible. Notwithstanding that CAM use is fairly predictable by socio-demographic variables, further studies should be directed to know the variables useful for predicting the use of each CAM approach.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing & Midwifery, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. ashorofi@yahoo.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21982133

Citation

Shorofi, Seyed Afshin. "Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Among Hospitalised Patients: Reported Use of CAM and Reasons for Use, CAM Preferred During Hospitalisation, and the Socio-demographic Determinants of CAM Users." Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, vol. 17, no. 4, 2011, pp. 199-205.
Shorofi SA. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among hospitalised patients: reported use of CAM and reasons for use, CAM preferred during hospitalisation, and the socio-demographic determinants of CAM users. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2011;17(4):199-205.
Shorofi, S. A. (2011). Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among hospitalised patients: reported use of CAM and reasons for use, CAM preferred during hospitalisation, and the socio-demographic determinants of CAM users. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 17(4), 199-205. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2011.05.001
Shorofi SA. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Among Hospitalised Patients: Reported Use of CAM and Reasons for Use, CAM Preferred During Hospitalisation, and the Socio-demographic Determinants of CAM Users. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2011;17(4):199-205. PubMed PMID: 21982133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among hospitalised patients: reported use of CAM and reasons for use, CAM preferred during hospitalisation, and the socio-demographic determinants of CAM users. A1 - Shorofi,Seyed Afshin, Y1 - 2011/06/25/ PY - 2011/04/26/received PY - 2011/05/26/accepted PY - 2011/10/11/entrez PY - 2011/10/11/pubmed PY - 2012/4/6/medline SP - 199 EP - 205 JF - Complementary therapies in clinical practice JO - Complement Ther Clin Pract VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: This paper reports a study to examine hospitalised patients' frequency and patterns of CAM use, their reasons for CAM use, their preferences of CAMs during hospitalisation, and the association between patients' socio-demographic variables and use of each individual CAM/CAM domain. METHODS: A convenience sample of 353 patients hospitalised in 19 surgical wards at four metropolitan hospitals completed a questionnaire on CAM use and socio-demographic variables. RESULTS: The response rate was 73.5%, and over 90% of the sample acknowledged using CAMs. Non-herbal supplements (60.3%) and massage therapy (45%) were the most frequently used CAMs, with biologically based therapies (68.8%) as well as mind-body interventions (65.4%) being the most often used CAM domains. About 1 in 10 patients (9.6%) used CAMs from all five domains. With the exception of herbal-botanical therapies, self-prayer for health reasons/spiritual healing and music therapy, all CAMs were mainly used on an 'only when needed' basis. The most common reason nominated for using CAMs was that '[it] fits into my way of life/philosophy' (26%). The majority of patients declared interest in and support for the hospital providing CAMs. Patients were most inclined to choose therapies categorised as manipulative and body-based methods (65.4%) for use in hospital. Massage therapy (53.5%) and non-herbal supplements (43.1%) were the top two CAMs favoured for use in hospital. CAM use was also dependent of socio-demographic data (age, gender, marital status, place of residence, education level, religion, and income in hospitalised patients). CONCLUSION: The use of CAMs is pervasive amongst surgical in-patients, making it feasible to initially assess these patients for CAM use and provide them with clinically approved CAMs where possible. Notwithstanding that CAM use is fairly predictable by socio-demographic variables, further studies should be directed to know the variables useful for predicting the use of each CAM approach. SN - 1873-6947 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21982133/Complementary_and_alternative_medicine__CAM__among_hospitalised_patients:_reported_use_of_CAM_and_reasons_for_use_CAM_preferred_during_hospitalisation_and_the_socio_demographic_determinants_of_CAM_users_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1744-3881(11)00045-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -