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Voluntary drinking behaviour, fluid balance and psychological affect when ingesting water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise.
Appetite 2012; 58(1):56-63A

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of drink composition on voluntary intake, hydration status, selected physiological responses and affective states during simulated gymnasium-based exercise. In a randomised counterbalanced design, 12 physically active adults performed three 20-min intervals of cardiovascular exercise at 75% heart rate maximum, one 20-min period of resistance exercise and 20 min of recovery with ad libitum access to water (W), a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) or with no access to fluids (NF). Fluid intake was greater with CES than W (1706±157 vs. 1171±152 mL; P<0.01) and more adequate hydration was achieved in CES trials (NF vs. W vs. CES: -1668±73 vs. -700±99 vs. -273±78 g; P<0.01). Plasma glucose concentrations were highest with CES (CES vs. NF vs. W: 4.26±0.12 vs. 4.06±0.08 vs. 3.97±0.10 mmol/L; P<0.05). Pleasure ratings were better maintained with ad libitum intake of CES (CES vs. NF vs. W: 2.72±0.23 vs. 1.09±0.20 vs. 1.74±0.33; P<0.01). Under conditions of voluntary drinking, CES resulted in more adequate hydration and a better maintenance of affective states than W or NF during gymnasium-based exercise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sport, Health and Exercise Science Research Group, Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, United Kingdom. O.J.Peacock@bath.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21986184

Citation

Peacock, Oliver J., et al. "Voluntary Drinking Behaviour, Fluid Balance and Psychological Affect when Ingesting Water or a Carbohydrate-electrolyte Solution During Exercise." Appetite, vol. 58, no. 1, 2012, pp. 56-63.
Peacock OJ, Thompson D, Stokes KA. Voluntary drinking behaviour, fluid balance and psychological affect when ingesting water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise. Appetite. 2012;58(1):56-63.
Peacock, O. J., Thompson, D., & Stokes, K. A. (2012). Voluntary drinking behaviour, fluid balance and psychological affect when ingesting water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise. Appetite, 58(1), pp. 56-63. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2011.08.023.
Peacock OJ, Thompson D, Stokes KA. Voluntary Drinking Behaviour, Fluid Balance and Psychological Affect when Ingesting Water or a Carbohydrate-electrolyte Solution During Exercise. Appetite. 2012;58(1):56-63. PubMed PMID: 21986184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Voluntary drinking behaviour, fluid balance and psychological affect when ingesting water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise. AU - Peacock,Oliver J, AU - Thompson,Dylan, AU - Stokes,Keith A, Y1 - 2011/09/29/ PY - 2011/06/06/received PY - 2011/08/15/revised PY - 2011/08/31/accepted PY - 2011/10/12/entrez PY - 2011/10/12/pubmed PY - 2012/5/18/medline SP - 56 EP - 63 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 58 IS - 1 N2 - This study investigated the effects of drink composition on voluntary intake, hydration status, selected physiological responses and affective states during simulated gymnasium-based exercise. In a randomised counterbalanced design, 12 physically active adults performed three 20-min intervals of cardiovascular exercise at 75% heart rate maximum, one 20-min period of resistance exercise and 20 min of recovery with ad libitum access to water (W), a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) or with no access to fluids (NF). Fluid intake was greater with CES than W (1706±157 vs. 1171±152 mL; P<0.01) and more adequate hydration was achieved in CES trials (NF vs. W vs. CES: -1668±73 vs. -700±99 vs. -273±78 g; P<0.01). Plasma glucose concentrations were highest with CES (CES vs. NF vs. W: 4.26±0.12 vs. 4.06±0.08 vs. 3.97±0.10 mmol/L; P<0.05). Pleasure ratings were better maintained with ad libitum intake of CES (CES vs. NF vs. W: 2.72±0.23 vs. 1.09±0.20 vs. 1.74±0.33; P<0.01). Under conditions of voluntary drinking, CES resulted in more adequate hydration and a better maintenance of affective states than W or NF during gymnasium-based exercise. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21986184/Voluntary_drinking_behaviour_fluid_balance_and_psychological_affect_when_ingesting_water_or_a_carbohydrate_electrolyte_solution_during_exercise_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(11)00568-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -