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Temporary off-frequency listening after noise trauma.
Hear Res. 2011 Dec; 282(1-2):81-91.HR

Abstract

Hearing loss is routinely estimated from the audiogram, even though this measure gives only a rough approximation of hearing. Indeed, cochlear regions functioning poorly, if at all, called dead regions, are not detected by a simple audiogram. To detect cochlear dead regions, additional measurements of psychophysical tuning curves or thresholds in background noise (TEN test) are required. A first aim of this study was to assess the presence of dead regions after impulse noise trauma using psychophysical tuning curves. The procedure we used was based on a compromise between the need to collect reliable estimates of psychophysical tuning curves and the limited time available to obtain these estimates in a hospital setting. Psychophysical tuning curves were measured using simultaneous masking with a 2-alternative forced choice paradigm, where the target was randomly placed in one of the two masker presentations. It is well known that some components of noise-induced hearing loss are reversible. A second aim of this study was to examine the potential recovery of dead regions after acoustic trauma. A third issue addressed in this article was the relationship between noise-induced dead regions and tinnitus. We found that 70% of the subjects had dead regions after noise trauma, while 88% reported tinnitus. Moreover, we found that the extent of dead regions probably diminished in about 50% of subjects, which highlights the ability of the human auditory system to recover from noise-induced hearing loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laveran Hospital, 34, boulevard Laveran 13013, Marseille, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21986211

Citation

Etchelecou, M-C, et al. "Temporary Off-frequency Listening After Noise Trauma." Hearing Research, vol. 282, no. 1-2, 2011, pp. 81-91.
Etchelecou MC, Coulet O, Derkenne R, et al. Temporary off-frequency listening after noise trauma. Hear Res. 2011;282(1-2):81-91.
Etchelecou, M. C., Coulet, O., Derkenne, R., Tomasi, M., & Noreña, A. J. (2011). Temporary off-frequency listening after noise trauma. Hearing Research, 282(1-2), 81-91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2011.09.006
Etchelecou MC, et al. Temporary Off-frequency Listening After Noise Trauma. Hear Res. 2011;282(1-2):81-91. PubMed PMID: 21986211.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Temporary off-frequency listening after noise trauma. AU - Etchelecou,M-C, AU - Coulet,O, AU - Derkenne,R, AU - Tomasi,M, AU - Noreña,A J, Y1 - 2011/10/05/ PY - 2010/10/05/received PY - 2011/09/20/revised PY - 2011/09/21/accepted PY - 2011/10/12/entrez PY - 2011/10/12/pubmed PY - 2012/4/3/medline SP - 81 EP - 91 JF - Hearing research JO - Hear Res VL - 282 IS - 1-2 N2 - Hearing loss is routinely estimated from the audiogram, even though this measure gives only a rough approximation of hearing. Indeed, cochlear regions functioning poorly, if at all, called dead regions, are not detected by a simple audiogram. To detect cochlear dead regions, additional measurements of psychophysical tuning curves or thresholds in background noise (TEN test) are required. A first aim of this study was to assess the presence of dead regions after impulse noise trauma using psychophysical tuning curves. The procedure we used was based on a compromise between the need to collect reliable estimates of psychophysical tuning curves and the limited time available to obtain these estimates in a hospital setting. Psychophysical tuning curves were measured using simultaneous masking with a 2-alternative forced choice paradigm, where the target was randomly placed in one of the two masker presentations. It is well known that some components of noise-induced hearing loss are reversible. A second aim of this study was to examine the potential recovery of dead regions after acoustic trauma. A third issue addressed in this article was the relationship between noise-induced dead regions and tinnitus. We found that 70% of the subjects had dead regions after noise trauma, while 88% reported tinnitus. Moreover, we found that the extent of dead regions probably diminished in about 50% of subjects, which highlights the ability of the human auditory system to recover from noise-induced hearing loss. SN - 1878-5891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21986211/Temporary_off_frequency_listening_after_noise_trauma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5955(11)00245-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -