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The rationale and clinical effectiveness of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov; 45 Suppl:S145-8.JC

Abstract

The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is still unknown. However, several lines of epidemiological, physiological, and clinical data suggest a role for intestinal bacteria in the pathogenesis of the disorder. Recent microbiology studies demonstrated differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS and healthy individuals. In addition, physiological studies have shown that manipulation of the intestinal microbiota by antibiotics, prebiotics, or probiotics can affect intestinal functions (eg, motility and sensation) relevant in the pathogenesis of IBS. Several randomized control trials comparing the effects of probiotics versus placebo in IBS have been published. Despite considerable differences in study design, dosing regimens, probiotic species used, and reported clinical end points, the current data indicate improving IBS symptoms and reducing the risk of persistent IBS symptoms. The data on the use of probiotics in children with IBS is more limited but is also suggestive for beneficial effects. The inconsistencies between the studies underline the need to look at each probiotic product separately for specific conditions, symptoms, and patient populations. This review article discusses the rationale for targeting the intestinal microbiota in patient with IBS and provides an overview and a critical evaluation of the currently available clinical data on the use of probiotics in the treatment of patients with IBS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7080, USA. ringel@med.unc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21992954

Citation

Ringel, Yehuda, and Tamar Ringel-Kulka. "The Rationale and Clinical Effectiveness of Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 45 Suppl, 2011, pp. S145-8.
Ringel Y, Ringel-Kulka T. The rationale and clinical effectiveness of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2011;45 Suppl:S145-8.
Ringel, Y., & Ringel-Kulka, T. (2011). The rationale and clinical effectiveness of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 45 Suppl, S145-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e31822d32d3
Ringel Y, Ringel-Kulka T. The Rationale and Clinical Effectiveness of Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2011;45 Suppl:S145-8. PubMed PMID: 21992954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The rationale and clinical effectiveness of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Ringel,Yehuda, AU - Ringel-Kulka,Tamar, PY - 2011/10/14/entrez PY - 2011/10/14/pubmed PY - 2012/2/15/medline SP - S145 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J Clin Gastroenterol VL - 45 Suppl N2 - The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is still unknown. However, several lines of epidemiological, physiological, and clinical data suggest a role for intestinal bacteria in the pathogenesis of the disorder. Recent microbiology studies demonstrated differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS and healthy individuals. In addition, physiological studies have shown that manipulation of the intestinal microbiota by antibiotics, prebiotics, or probiotics can affect intestinal functions (eg, motility and sensation) relevant in the pathogenesis of IBS. Several randomized control trials comparing the effects of probiotics versus placebo in IBS have been published. Despite considerable differences in study design, dosing regimens, probiotic species used, and reported clinical end points, the current data indicate improving IBS symptoms and reducing the risk of persistent IBS symptoms. The data on the use of probiotics in children with IBS is more limited but is also suggestive for beneficial effects. The inconsistencies between the studies underline the need to look at each probiotic product separately for specific conditions, symptoms, and patient populations. This review article discusses the rationale for targeting the intestinal microbiota in patient with IBS and provides an overview and a critical evaluation of the currently available clinical data on the use of probiotics in the treatment of patients with IBS. SN - 1539-2031 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21992954/The_rationale_and_clinical_effectiveness_of_probiotics_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e31822d32d3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -