Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of hypertension in middle-aged and older women.
Am J Hypertens. 2012 Feb; 25(2):180-9.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Despite the promising findings from short-term intervention trials, the long-term effect of habitual fruit and vegetable intake on blood pressure (BP) remains uncertain. We therefore assessed the prospective association between baseline intake of fruits and vegetables and the risk of hypertension in a large cohort of middle-aged and older women.

METHODS

We conducted analyses among 28,082 US female health professionals aged ≥39 years, free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hypertension at baseline. Baseline intake of fruits and vegetables was assessed using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). Incident hypertension was identified from annual follow-up questionnaires.

RESULTS

During 12.9 years of follow-up, 13,633 women developed incident hypertension. After basic adjustment including age, race, and total energy intake, the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was 0.97 (0.89-1.05), 0.93 (0.85-1.01), 0.89 (0.82-0.97), and 0.86 (0.78-0.94) comparing women who consumed 2- <4, 4- <6, 6- <8, and ≥8 servings/day of total fruits and vegetables with those consuming <2 servings/day. These associations did not change after additionally adjusting for lifestyle factors but were attenuated after further adjustment for other dietary factors. When fruits and vegetables were analyzed separately, higher intake of all fruits but not all vegetables remained significantly associated with reduced risk of hypertension after adjustment for lifestyle and dietary factors. Adding body mass index (BMI) to the models eliminated all associations.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher intake of fruits and vegetables, as part of a healthy dietary pattern, may only contribute a modest beneficial effect to hypertension prevention, possibly through improvement in body weight regulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. luwang@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21993367

Citation

Wang, Lu, et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Hypertension in Middle-aged and Older Women." American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 25, no. 2, 2012, pp. 180-9.
Wang L, Manson JE, Gaziano JM, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of hypertension in middle-aged and older women. Am J Hypertens. 2012;25(2):180-9.
Wang, L., Manson, J. E., Gaziano, J. M., Buring, J. E., & Sesso, H. D. (2012). Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of hypertension in middle-aged and older women. American Journal of Hypertension, 25(2), 180-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajh.2011.186
Wang L, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and the Risk of Hypertension in Middle-aged and Older Women. Am J Hypertens. 2012;25(2):180-9. PubMed PMID: 21993367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of hypertension in middle-aged and older women. AU - Wang,Lu, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Gaziano,J Michael, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Sesso,Howard D, Y1 - 2011/10/13/ PY - 2011/10/14/entrez PY - 2011/10/14/pubmed PY - 2012/5/30/medline SP - 180 EP - 9 JF - American journal of hypertension JO - Am. J. Hypertens. VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the promising findings from short-term intervention trials, the long-term effect of habitual fruit and vegetable intake on blood pressure (BP) remains uncertain. We therefore assessed the prospective association between baseline intake of fruits and vegetables and the risk of hypertension in a large cohort of middle-aged and older women. METHODS: We conducted analyses among 28,082 US female health professionals aged ≥39 years, free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and hypertension at baseline. Baseline intake of fruits and vegetables was assessed using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). Incident hypertension was identified from annual follow-up questionnaires. RESULTS: During 12.9 years of follow-up, 13,633 women developed incident hypertension. After basic adjustment including age, race, and total energy intake, the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was 0.97 (0.89-1.05), 0.93 (0.85-1.01), 0.89 (0.82-0.97), and 0.86 (0.78-0.94) comparing women who consumed 2- <4, 4- <6, 6- <8, and ≥8 servings/day of total fruits and vegetables with those consuming <2 servings/day. These associations did not change after additionally adjusting for lifestyle factors but were attenuated after further adjustment for other dietary factors. When fruits and vegetables were analyzed separately, higher intake of all fruits but not all vegetables remained significantly associated with reduced risk of hypertension after adjustment for lifestyle and dietary factors. Adding body mass index (BMI) to the models eliminated all associations. CONCLUSIONS: Higher intake of fruits and vegetables, as part of a healthy dietary pattern, may only contribute a modest beneficial effect to hypertension prevention, possibly through improvement in body weight regulation. SN - 1941-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21993367/Fruit_and_vegetable_intake_and_the_risk_of_hypertension_in_middle_aged_and_older_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajh/article-lookup/doi/10.1038/ajh.2011.186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -