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Cost-effectiveness of intensive tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory.
Am J Manag Care. 2011 Oct 01; 17(10):e393-8.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate cost-effectiveness of a tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) and consistent with the Public Health Service (PHS)-sponsored Clinical Practice Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence.

STUDY DESIGN

Adult smokers were recruited into a randomized cessation-induction trial of an intensive intervention versus community care. Seven-day point prevalence (7dPP) tobacco abstinence and cost-effectiveness of the intervention were examined using 737 participants with health insurance.

METHODS

Community care (CC) participants received smoking-cessation pamphlets and information on local treatment programs. Intervention participants received those materials and were asked to meet 4 times over 6 months with study counselors to discuss their health in a manner that supported autonomy and perceived competence. The third-party payer's perspective was used for this analysis, and the primary outcome was cost-effectiveness using self-reported 7dPP tobacco abstinence at 6 months. Sensitivity analyses were performed using costs of generic medications, biochemically validated tobacco abstinence, actual rates of tobacco abstinence, life-years saved (not adjusted for quality of life), and costs in 2011 US dollars. A subgroup analysis was conducted using smokers who did not want to stop within 30 days.

RESULTS

Smokers in the intervention, relative to CC, were more likely to attain 7dPP tobacco abstinence at 6 months. The overall incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $1258 per quality-adjusted life-year saved, in US dollars. The sensitivity and subgroup analyses yielded similar results.

CONCLUSIONS

An intervention based on SDT and consistent with the PHS Guideline facilitated tobacco abstinence among insured smokers and was cost-effective compared with other tobacco dependence and medical interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, University of Rochester, 46 Prince St, Ste 3001, Rochester, NY, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21999719

Citation

Pesis-Katz, Irena, et al. "Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Tobacco Dependence Intervention Based On Self-determination Theory." The American Journal of Managed Care, vol. 17, no. 10, 2011, pp. e393-8.
Pesis-Katz I, Williams GC, Niemiec CP, et al. Cost-effectiveness of intensive tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory. Am J Manag Care. 2011;17(10):e393-8.
Pesis-Katz, I., Williams, G. C., Niemiec, C. P., & Fiscella, K. (2011). Cost-effectiveness of intensive tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory. The American Journal of Managed Care, 17(10), e393-8.
Pesis-Katz I, et al. Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Tobacco Dependence Intervention Based On Self-determination Theory. Am J Manag Care. 2011 Oct 1;17(10):e393-8. PubMed PMID: 21999719.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cost-effectiveness of intensive tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory. AU - Pesis-Katz,Irena, AU - Williams,Geoffrey C, AU - Niemiec,Christopher P, AU - Fiscella,Kevin, Y1 - 2011/10/01/ PY - 2011/10/18/entrez PY - 2011/10/18/pubmed PY - 2012/3/27/medline SP - e393 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of managed care JO - Am J Manag Care VL - 17 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To evaluate cost-effectiveness of a tobacco dependence intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) and consistent with the Public Health Service (PHS)-sponsored Clinical Practice Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence. STUDY DESIGN: Adult smokers were recruited into a randomized cessation-induction trial of an intensive intervention versus community care. Seven-day point prevalence (7dPP) tobacco abstinence and cost-effectiveness of the intervention were examined using 737 participants with health insurance. METHODS: Community care (CC) participants received smoking-cessation pamphlets and information on local treatment programs. Intervention participants received those materials and were asked to meet 4 times over 6 months with study counselors to discuss their health in a manner that supported autonomy and perceived competence. The third-party payer's perspective was used for this analysis, and the primary outcome was cost-effectiveness using self-reported 7dPP tobacco abstinence at 6 months. Sensitivity analyses were performed using costs of generic medications, biochemically validated tobacco abstinence, actual rates of tobacco abstinence, life-years saved (not adjusted for quality of life), and costs in 2011 US dollars. A subgroup analysis was conducted using smokers who did not want to stop within 30 days. RESULTS: Smokers in the intervention, relative to CC, were more likely to attain 7dPP tobacco abstinence at 6 months. The overall incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $1258 per quality-adjusted life-year saved, in US dollars. The sensitivity and subgroup analyses yielded similar results. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention based on SDT and consistent with the PHS Guideline facilitated tobacco abstinence among insured smokers and was cost-effective compared with other tobacco dependence and medical interventions. SN - 1936-2692 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21999719/Cost_effectiveness_of_intensive_tobacco_dependence_intervention_based_on_self_determination_theory_ L2 - https://www.ajmc.com/pubMed.php?pii=52450 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -