Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Promising prevention approaches: tenofovir gel and prophylactic use of antiretroviral medications.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2011 Dec; 8(4):241-8.CH

Abstract

Thirty years into the global HIV epidemic, the need for effective prevention strategies remains critical. In July 2010, the CAPRISA-004 study demonstrated that topical administration of a gel containing the antiretroviral agent tenofovir decreased the risk of HIV acquisition among at-risk heterosexual women. Subsequently, the iPrEx study reported that prophylactic use of a daily oral tablet containing tenofovir and emtricitabine reduced the risk of HIV acquisition among high-risk men who have sex with men. These studies illustrate the promise of antiretroviral pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) as an innovative prevention approach. This review discusses the rationale for chemoprophylaxis, compares the advantages of topical and oral delivery, outlines recommended safety monitoring, offers principles to guide selection of antiretroviral agents, and highlights potential unintended consequences of PrEP use. If future studies confirm the safety and efficacy of tenofovir gel and oral PrEP, successful implementation of these strategies could significantly impact the HIV epidemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA. dkrakowe@bidmc.harvard.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22002729

Citation

Krakower, Douglas, and Kenneth H. Mayer. "Promising Prevention Approaches: Tenofovir Gel and Prophylactic Use of Antiretroviral Medications." Current HIV/AIDS Reports, vol. 8, no. 4, 2011, pp. 241-8.
Krakower D, Mayer KH. Promising prevention approaches: tenofovir gel and prophylactic use of antiretroviral medications. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2011;8(4):241-8.
Krakower, D., & Mayer, K. H. (2011). Promising prevention approaches: tenofovir gel and prophylactic use of antiretroviral medications. Current HIV/AIDS Reports, 8(4), 241-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11904-011-0094-4
Krakower D, Mayer KH. Promising Prevention Approaches: Tenofovir Gel and Prophylactic Use of Antiretroviral Medications. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2011;8(4):241-8. PubMed PMID: 22002729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Promising prevention approaches: tenofovir gel and prophylactic use of antiretroviral medications. AU - Krakower,Douglas, AU - Mayer,Kenneth H, PY - 2011/10/18/entrez PY - 2011/10/18/pubmed PY - 2012/1/4/medline SP - 241 EP - 8 JF - Current HIV/AIDS reports JO - Curr HIV/AIDS Rep VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - Thirty years into the global HIV epidemic, the need for effective prevention strategies remains critical. In July 2010, the CAPRISA-004 study demonstrated that topical administration of a gel containing the antiretroviral agent tenofovir decreased the risk of HIV acquisition among at-risk heterosexual women. Subsequently, the iPrEx study reported that prophylactic use of a daily oral tablet containing tenofovir and emtricitabine reduced the risk of HIV acquisition among high-risk men who have sex with men. These studies illustrate the promise of antiretroviral pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) as an innovative prevention approach. This review discusses the rationale for chemoprophylaxis, compares the advantages of topical and oral delivery, outlines recommended safety monitoring, offers principles to guide selection of antiretroviral agents, and highlights potential unintended consequences of PrEP use. If future studies confirm the safety and efficacy of tenofovir gel and oral PrEP, successful implementation of these strategies could significantly impact the HIV epidemic. SN - 1548-3576 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22002729/Promising_prevention_approaches:_tenofovir_gel_and_prophylactic_use_of_antiretroviral_medications_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11904-011-0094-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -