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Managing sleep problems in school aged children with ADHD: a pilot randomised controlled trial.
Sleep Med. 2011 Oct; 12(9):932-5.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the feasibility and helpfulness of a behavioral sleep program for children with ADHD, and explore the impact of different program dosages on child and family outcomes.

METHODS

Randomised trial comparing a brief (1 session, n=13) and extended (2-3 sessions, n=14) sleep program in children with ADHD (aged 5-14 years) and at least one behavioral sleep disorder (American Academy of Sleep Medicine Criteria). Outcomes included helpfulness and use of interventions, child sleep (parent-reported sleep problem; Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (ADHD IV Rating Scale), daily functioning (Daily Parent Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior), quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), and caregiver mental health (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales).

RESULTS

Twenty-seven families (63% of those eligible) took part. Most parents would recommend the program to others (95%) and found the strategies helpful. Five months post-randomisation, 67% of parents in both groups reported that their child's sleep problems had resolved. Child quality of life, daily functioning, and parental anxiety also improved in the extended group only (Cohen's d: 0.39, 0.47 and 0.50, respectively). There was minimal change in ADHD symptom scores from baseline to 5 months in either group.

CONCLUSIONS

A behavioral sleep intervention in children with ADHD is feasible to deliver and improves child sleep by parent report. The extended program resulted in greater improvements in child and caregiver outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. emma.sciberras@mcri.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22005602

Citation

Sciberras, Emma, et al. "Managing Sleep Problems in School Aged Children With ADHD: a Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial." Sleep Medicine, vol. 12, no. 9, 2011, pp. 932-5.
Sciberras E, Fulton M, Efron D, et al. Managing sleep problems in school aged children with ADHD: a pilot randomised controlled trial. Sleep Med. 2011;12(9):932-5.
Sciberras, E., Fulton, M., Efron, D., Oberklaid, F., & Hiscock, H. (2011). Managing sleep problems in school aged children with ADHD: a pilot randomised controlled trial. Sleep Medicine, 12(9), 932-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.02.006
Sciberras E, et al. Managing Sleep Problems in School Aged Children With ADHD: a Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial. Sleep Med. 2011;12(9):932-5. PubMed PMID: 22005602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Managing sleep problems in school aged children with ADHD: a pilot randomised controlled trial. AU - Sciberras,Emma, AU - Fulton,Marguerite, AU - Efron,Daryl, AU - Oberklaid,Frank, AU - Hiscock,Harriet, Y1 - 2011/10/17/ PY - 2010/12/13/received PY - 2011/02/15/revised PY - 2011/02/21/accepted PY - 2011/10/19/entrez PY - 2011/10/19/pubmed PY - 2012/3/9/medline SP - 932 EP - 5 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 12 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and helpfulness of a behavioral sleep program for children with ADHD, and explore the impact of different program dosages on child and family outcomes. METHODS: Randomised trial comparing a brief (1 session, n=13) and extended (2-3 sessions, n=14) sleep program in children with ADHD (aged 5-14 years) and at least one behavioral sleep disorder (American Academy of Sleep Medicine Criteria). Outcomes included helpfulness and use of interventions, child sleep (parent-reported sleep problem; Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire), ADHD symptoms (ADHD IV Rating Scale), daily functioning (Daily Parent Rating of Evening and Morning Behavior), quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory), and caregiver mental health (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales). RESULTS: Twenty-seven families (63% of those eligible) took part. Most parents would recommend the program to others (95%) and found the strategies helpful. Five months post-randomisation, 67% of parents in both groups reported that their child's sleep problems had resolved. Child quality of life, daily functioning, and parental anxiety also improved in the extended group only (Cohen's d: 0.39, 0.47 and 0.50, respectively). There was minimal change in ADHD symptom scores from baseline to 5 months in either group. CONCLUSIONS: A behavioral sleep intervention in children with ADHD is feasible to deliver and improves child sleep by parent report. The extended program resulted in greater improvements in child and caregiver outcomes. SN - 1878-5506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22005602/Managing_sleep_problems_in_school_aged_children_with_ADHD:_a_pilot_randomised_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(11)00214-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -