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Human papillomavirus vaccination series initiation and completion, 2008-2009.
Pediatrics. 2011 Nov; 128(5):830-9.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal was to describe factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination series initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses) and parents' intent to have their daughters vaccinated.

METHODS

Data from the 2008 and 2009 National Immunization Survey-Teen were analyzed to estimate HPV vaccination coverage among girls 13 to 17 years of age (N = 18,228) and to examine associations of vaccination coverage with demographic characteristics.

RESULTS

Overall, 40.5% of girls had received ≥1 HPV vaccine dose, and 53.3% of those girls completed the series. Factors independently associated with vaccination initiation included older age, having an 11- to 12-year preventive visit, insurance status, mother's age and marital status, not receiving all vaccines at public facilities, and provider recommendation, which was the factor most strongly associated with initiation (prevalence ratio: 2.6 [95% confidence interval: 2.4-2.9]). Compared with white girls (60.4%), black (46.0%) and Hispanic (40.3%) girls were less likely to complete the series. Lack of knowledge of the vaccine (19.4%), vaccination was not needed (18.8%), the daughter was not sexually active (18.3%), and a provider did not recommend (13.1%) were the most common reasons for parents' nonintent to have their daughters vaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS

Although HPV vaccine coverage rates are increasing, they are still below target levels. Recommendations by providers to adolescent patients and parents likely would improve vaccine uptake. Parental education regarding disease risks and benefits of HPV vaccination before exposure is needed to promote vaccine uptake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Immunization Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. cdorell@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22007006

Citation

Dorell, Christina G., et al. "Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Series Initiation and Completion, 2008-2009." Pediatrics, vol. 128, no. 5, 2011, pp. 830-9.
Dorell CG, Yankey D, Santibanez TA, et al. Human papillomavirus vaccination series initiation and completion, 2008-2009. Pediatrics. 2011;128(5):830-9.
Dorell, C. G., Yankey, D., Santibanez, T. A., & Markowitz, L. E. (2011). Human papillomavirus vaccination series initiation and completion, 2008-2009. Pediatrics, 128(5), 830-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-0950
Dorell CG, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Series Initiation and Completion, 2008-2009. Pediatrics. 2011;128(5):830-9. PubMed PMID: 22007006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human papillomavirus vaccination series initiation and completion, 2008-2009. AU - Dorell,Christina G, AU - Yankey,David, AU - Santibanez,Tammy A, AU - Markowitz,Lauri E, Y1 - 2011/10/17/ PY - 2011/10/19/entrez PY - 2011/10/19/pubmed PY - 2012/1/25/medline SP - 830 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 128 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The goal was to describe factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination series initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses) and parents' intent to have their daughters vaccinated. METHODS: Data from the 2008 and 2009 National Immunization Survey-Teen were analyzed to estimate HPV vaccination coverage among girls 13 to 17 years of age (N = 18,228) and to examine associations of vaccination coverage with demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Overall, 40.5% of girls had received ≥1 HPV vaccine dose, and 53.3% of those girls completed the series. Factors independently associated with vaccination initiation included older age, having an 11- to 12-year preventive visit, insurance status, mother's age and marital status, not receiving all vaccines at public facilities, and provider recommendation, which was the factor most strongly associated with initiation (prevalence ratio: 2.6 [95% confidence interval: 2.4-2.9]). Compared with white girls (60.4%), black (46.0%) and Hispanic (40.3%) girls were less likely to complete the series. Lack of knowledge of the vaccine (19.4%), vaccination was not needed (18.8%), the daughter was not sexually active (18.3%), and a provider did not recommend (13.1%) were the most common reasons for parents' nonintent to have their daughters vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: Although HPV vaccine coverage rates are increasing, they are still below target levels. Recommendations by providers to adolescent patients and parents likely would improve vaccine uptake. Parental education regarding disease risks and benefits of HPV vaccination before exposure is needed to promote vaccine uptake. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22007006/Human_papillomavirus_vaccination_series_initiation_and_completion_2008_2009_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22007006 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -