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Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns.
J Prosthodont. 2012 Jan; 21(1):28-32.JP

Abstract

PURPOSE

The aim of this study was to determine effect of compressive cyclic loading on fatigue resistance and microleakage of monolithic CAD/CAM molar ceramic and composite crowns.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Thirty-two extracted molars were prepared to receive CEREC crowns according to manufacturer's guidelines using a special paralleling device (Parallel-A-Prep). Sixteen feldspathic ceramic crowns (VITABLOCS Mark II) (VMII) and 16 resin-composite crowns (Paradigm-MZ100 blocks) (PMZ) were milled using a CEREC-3D machine. Eight crowns of each group were cemented to their respective teeth using self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F-2.0) (PAN), and eight were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX-Unicem-Clicker) (RXU). Following storage for 1 week in water, specimens were subjected to uniaxial compressive cyclic loading in an Instron testing machine at 12 Hz for 1,000,000 cycles. Load was applied at the central fossa, and the cycle range was 60-600 N. Specimens were then subjected to microleakage testing. Data were statistically analyzed using factorial ANOVA and Post Hoc (Tukey HSD) tests.

RESULTS

All composite crowns survived compressive cyclic loading without fracture, while three ceramic crowns from the subgroup cemented with RXU developed surface cracks at the center of occlusal surfaces, extending laterally. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other three subgroups (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

After 1,000,000 cycles of compressive cyclic loading, PMZ composite molar crowns were more fatigue-resistant than VMII ceramic crowns. Cement type had a significant effect on fatigue resistance of the ceramic crowns but not the composite ones. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other subgroups (p < 0.05).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Crown and Bridge Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22008462

Citation

Kassem, Amr S., et al. "Fatigue Resistance and Microleakage of CAD/CAM Ceramic and Composite Molar Crowns." Journal of Prosthodontics : Official Journal of the American College of Prosthodontists, vol. 21, no. 1, 2012, pp. 28-32.
Kassem AS, Atta O, El-Mowafy O. Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns. J Prosthodont. 2012;21(1):28-32.
Kassem, A. S., Atta, O., & El-Mowafy, O. (2012). Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns. Journal of Prosthodontics : Official Journal of the American College of Prosthodontists, 21(1), 28-32. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-849X.2011.00773.x
Kassem AS, Atta O, El-Mowafy O. Fatigue Resistance and Microleakage of CAD/CAM Ceramic and Composite Molar Crowns. J Prosthodont. 2012;21(1):28-32. PubMed PMID: 22008462.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fatigue resistance and microleakage of CAD/CAM ceramic and composite molar crowns. AU - Kassem,Amr S, AU - Atta,Osama, AU - El-Mowafy,Omar, Y1 - 2011/10/18/ PY - 2011/10/20/entrez PY - 2011/10/20/pubmed PY - 2012/6/19/medline SP - 28 EP - 32 JF - Journal of prosthodontics : official journal of the American College of Prosthodontists JO - J Prosthodont VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine effect of compressive cyclic loading on fatigue resistance and microleakage of monolithic CAD/CAM molar ceramic and composite crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two extracted molars were prepared to receive CEREC crowns according to manufacturer's guidelines using a special paralleling device (Parallel-A-Prep). Sixteen feldspathic ceramic crowns (VITABLOCS Mark II) (VMII) and 16 resin-composite crowns (Paradigm-MZ100 blocks) (PMZ) were milled using a CEREC-3D machine. Eight crowns of each group were cemented to their respective teeth using self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F-2.0) (PAN), and eight were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX-Unicem-Clicker) (RXU). Following storage for 1 week in water, specimens were subjected to uniaxial compressive cyclic loading in an Instron testing machine at 12 Hz for 1,000,000 cycles. Load was applied at the central fossa, and the cycle range was 60-600 N. Specimens were then subjected to microleakage testing. Data were statistically analyzed using factorial ANOVA and Post Hoc (Tukey HSD) tests. RESULTS: All composite crowns survived compressive cyclic loading without fracture, while three ceramic crowns from the subgroup cemented with RXU developed surface cracks at the center of occlusal surfaces, extending laterally. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other three subgroups (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: After 1,000,000 cycles of compressive cyclic loading, PMZ composite molar crowns were more fatigue-resistant than VMII ceramic crowns. Cement type had a significant effect on fatigue resistance of the ceramic crowns but not the composite ones. Microleakage scores of ceramic crowns cemented with PAN were significantly lower than those of the other subgroups (p < 0.05). SN - 1532-849X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22008462/Fatigue_resistance_and_microleakage_of_CAD/CAM_ceramic_and_composite_molar_crowns_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -