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Can bilateral varicose vein surgery be performed safely in an ambulatory setting?
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Jan; 43(1):95-9.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Surgery for varicose veins is still the method of choice worldwide. When varicose veins require bilateral surgery, a single procedure often is the preferred choice by the patient. Today, unilateral varicose vein surgery is frequently performed as an outpatient procedure, while in many institutions bilateral surgery is done as an in-hospital procedure.

DESIGN

Retrospective comparative study.

METHODS

Between 1 October 2004 and 31 October 2006, 433 patients underwent surgery for the great saphenous vein as in-patient procedure (303 unilateral and 130 bilateral), period 1. From 1 November 2006 until 31 December 2009, 825 patients had ambulatory great saphenous vein surgery (550 unilateral and 275 bilateral), period 2. We have compared unilateral and bilateral varicose vein surgery (high ligation and stripping of the great saphenous vein) and in-hospital procedures with ambulatory surgery, with regard to postoperative complications, postoperative pain and midterm follow-up.

RESULTS

Operation time and total length of stay in the institution following varicose vein surgery were significantly shorter for period 2 compared with period 1 for both unilateral and bilateral surgery, without other differences between the groups. There were few postoperative complications without differences between periods, and between unilateral and bilateral surgery (wound infection 0.5%, haematoma requiring drainage 0.2%, transient paraesthesia 1.1%, superficial localised thrombophlebitis 0.6% and deep vein thrombosis in one unilaterally operated case only).

CONCLUSIONS

Bilateral varicose vein surgery can be safely performed as an outpatient procedure, without increased risk of postoperative complications, increased postoperative discomfort or midterm adverse effects compared with unilateral surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Venous Centre, University Hospital of Geneva and Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, 4 rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, CH 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22014896

Citation

Gemayel, G, and J T. Christenson. "Can Bilateral Varicose Vein Surgery Be Performed Safely in an Ambulatory Setting?" European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : the Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery, vol. 43, no. 1, 2012, pp. 95-9.
Gemayel G, Christenson JT. Can bilateral varicose vein surgery be performed safely in an ambulatory setting? Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012;43(1):95-9.
Gemayel, G., & Christenson, J. T. (2012). Can bilateral varicose vein surgery be performed safely in an ambulatory setting? European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery : the Official Journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery, 43(1), 95-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2011.09.022
Gemayel G, Christenson JT. Can Bilateral Varicose Vein Surgery Be Performed Safely in an Ambulatory Setting. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012;43(1):95-9. PubMed PMID: 22014896.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can bilateral varicose vein surgery be performed safely in an ambulatory setting? AU - Gemayel,G, AU - Christenson,J T, Y1 - 2011/10/19/ PY - 2010/09/23/received PY - 2011/09/16/accepted PY - 2011/10/22/entrez PY - 2011/10/22/pubmed PY - 2012/2/9/medline SP - 95 EP - 9 JF - European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery : the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery JO - Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Surgery for varicose veins is still the method of choice worldwide. When varicose veins require bilateral surgery, a single procedure often is the preferred choice by the patient. Today, unilateral varicose vein surgery is frequently performed as an outpatient procedure, while in many institutions bilateral surgery is done as an in-hospital procedure. DESIGN: Retrospective comparative study. METHODS: Between 1 October 2004 and 31 October 2006, 433 patients underwent surgery for the great saphenous vein as in-patient procedure (303 unilateral and 130 bilateral), period 1. From 1 November 2006 until 31 December 2009, 825 patients had ambulatory great saphenous vein surgery (550 unilateral and 275 bilateral), period 2. We have compared unilateral and bilateral varicose vein surgery (high ligation and stripping of the great saphenous vein) and in-hospital procedures with ambulatory surgery, with regard to postoperative complications, postoperative pain and midterm follow-up. RESULTS: Operation time and total length of stay in the institution following varicose vein surgery were significantly shorter for period 2 compared with period 1 for both unilateral and bilateral surgery, without other differences between the groups. There were few postoperative complications without differences between periods, and between unilateral and bilateral surgery (wound infection 0.5%, haematoma requiring drainage 0.2%, transient paraesthesia 1.1%, superficial localised thrombophlebitis 0.6% and deep vein thrombosis in one unilaterally operated case only). CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral varicose vein surgery can be safely performed as an outpatient procedure, without increased risk of postoperative complications, increased postoperative discomfort or midterm adverse effects compared with unilateral surgery. SN - 1532-2165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22014896/Can_bilateral_varicose_vein_surgery_be_performed_safely_in_an_ambulatory_setting L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1078-5884(11)00622-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -