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Simulator based angiography education in neurosurgery: results of a pilot educational program.
J Neurointerv Surg. 2012 Nov; 4(6):438-41.JN

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The use of simulators in medical training has been on the rise over the past decade as a means to teach procedural skills to trainees in a risk free environment. The goal of this study was to pilot a simulator based skills course for inexperienced neurosurgical residents to teach the fundamentals of cervicocerebral catheterization and angiography, with the ultimate goal of defining a universal simulator based curriculum that could be incorporated into neurosurgical resident training in the future.

METHODS

Seven neurosurgery residents with no prior angiographic experience served as the pilot participants for this 2 day course. Four neurointerventional trained neurosurgeons served as faculty for instruction and evaluation. The majority of the course focused on hands-on simulator practice with close mentoring by faculty. Participants were evaluated with pre-course and post-course assessments.

RESULTS

Post-course written test scores were significantly higher than pre-course scores (p<0.001). Faculty assessments of participants' technical skills with angiography (graded 0-10, with 10 being best) also improved significantly from pre-course to post-course (pre 2.1; post 5.9; p<0.001). Objective simulator recorded assessments demonstrated a significant decrease in the time needed to complete a four vessel angiogram (p<0.001) and total fluoroscopic time (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Participant angiography skills, based on both faculty and simulator assessments, as well as participant knowledge, improved after this didactic, hands-on simulator course. Neuroendovascular simulator training appears to be a viable means of training inexperienced neurosurgery residents in the early learning stages of basic endovascular neurosurgery. Further studies evaluating the translation of procedural skills learned on the simulator to actual clinical skills in the angiography suite is necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610, USA. kyle.fargen@neurosurgery.ufl.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22015637

Citation

Fargen, Kyle Michael, et al. "Simulator Based Angiography Education in Neurosurgery: Results of a Pilot Educational Program." Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, vol. 4, no. 6, 2012, pp. 438-41.
Fargen KM, Siddiqui AH, Veznedaroglu E, et al. Simulator based angiography education in neurosurgery: results of a pilot educational program. J Neurointerv Surg. 2012;4(6):438-41.
Fargen, K. M., Siddiqui, A. H., Veznedaroglu, E., Turner, R. D., Ringer, A. J., & Mocco, J. (2012). Simulator based angiography education in neurosurgery: results of a pilot educational program. Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, 4(6), 438-41. https://doi.org/10.1136/neurintsurg-2011-010128
Fargen KM, et al. Simulator Based Angiography Education in Neurosurgery: Results of a Pilot Educational Program. J Neurointerv Surg. 2012;4(6):438-41. PubMed PMID: 22015637.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Simulator based angiography education in neurosurgery: results of a pilot educational program. AU - Fargen,Kyle Michael, AU - Siddiqui,Adnan H, AU - Veznedaroglu,Erol, AU - Turner,Raymond D, AU - Ringer,Andrew J, AU - Mocco,J, Y1 - 2011/10/20/ PY - 2011/10/22/entrez PY - 2011/10/22/pubmed PY - 2013/7/28/medline SP - 438 EP - 41 JF - Journal of neurointerventional surgery JO - J Neurointerv Surg VL - 4 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The use of simulators in medical training has been on the rise over the past decade as a means to teach procedural skills to trainees in a risk free environment. The goal of this study was to pilot a simulator based skills course for inexperienced neurosurgical residents to teach the fundamentals of cervicocerebral catheterization and angiography, with the ultimate goal of defining a universal simulator based curriculum that could be incorporated into neurosurgical resident training in the future. METHODS: Seven neurosurgery residents with no prior angiographic experience served as the pilot participants for this 2 day course. Four neurointerventional trained neurosurgeons served as faculty for instruction and evaluation. The majority of the course focused on hands-on simulator practice with close mentoring by faculty. Participants were evaluated with pre-course and post-course assessments. RESULTS: Post-course written test scores were significantly higher than pre-course scores (p<0.001). Faculty assessments of participants' technical skills with angiography (graded 0-10, with 10 being best) also improved significantly from pre-course to post-course (pre 2.1; post 5.9; p<0.001). Objective simulator recorded assessments demonstrated a significant decrease in the time needed to complete a four vessel angiogram (p<0.001) and total fluoroscopic time (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Participant angiography skills, based on both faculty and simulator assessments, as well as participant knowledge, improved after this didactic, hands-on simulator course. Neuroendovascular simulator training appears to be a viable means of training inexperienced neurosurgery residents in the early learning stages of basic endovascular neurosurgery. Further studies evaluating the translation of procedural skills learned on the simulator to actual clinical skills in the angiography suite is necessary. SN - 1759-8486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22015637/Simulator_based_angiography_education_in_neurosurgery:_results_of_a_pilot_educational_program_ L2 - http://jnis.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=22015637 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -