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Physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling in healthy men.
Aging Cell. 2012 Feb; 11(1):111-9.AC

Abstract

Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in repairing endothelial injury. Aging is associated with EPC dysfunction. Physical exercise has a beneficial impact on EPC activity. However, whether physical exercise can enhance the endothelial repair capacity of EPCs in healthy men with aging is not clear. Here, we investigated the effects of physical exercise on reendothelialization capacity and CXC chemokine receptor four (CXCR4) signaling in human EPCs. Before and after 12-week exercise, EPCs were isolated from elderly and young men. In vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs in a mouse model of carotid artery injury were measured. The expression of CXCR4 and its downstream signaling target Janus kinase-2 (JAK-2) were determined. Before exercise, in vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs were significantly reduced in elderly men compared with young men. After exercise intervention, in vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs from elderly men were markedly enhanced. Physical exercise increased a higher CXCR4 protein expression and higher JAK-2 phosphorylation levels of EPCs. The augmentation in reendothelialization capacity of EPCs was closely correlated with the upregulation of CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling and improvement of endothelial function. This study demonstrates for the first time that physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of EPCs by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling. Our findings provide insight into the novel mechanisms of physical exercise as a lifestyle intervention strategy to promote vascular health in aging population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hypertension and Vascular Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22018014

Citation

Xia, Wen-Hao, et al. "Physical Exercise Attenuates Age-associated Reduction in Endothelium-reparative Capacity of Endothelial Progenitor Cells By Increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 Signaling in Healthy Men." Aging Cell, vol. 11, no. 1, 2012, pp. 111-9.
Xia WH, Li J, Su C, et al. Physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling in healthy men. Aging Cell. 2012;11(1):111-9.
Xia, W. H., Li, J., Su, C., Yang, Z., Chen, L., Wu, F., Zhang, Y. Y., Yu, B. B., Qiu, Y. X., Wang, S. M., & Tao, J. (2012). Physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling in healthy men. Aging Cell, 11(1), 111-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00758.x
Xia WH, et al. Physical Exercise Attenuates Age-associated Reduction in Endothelium-reparative Capacity of Endothelial Progenitor Cells By Increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 Signaling in Healthy Men. Aging Cell. 2012;11(1):111-9. PubMed PMID: 22018014.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling in healthy men. AU - Xia,Wen-Hao, AU - Li,Jing, AU - Su,Chen, AU - Yang,Zhen, AU - Chen,Long, AU - Wu,Fang, AU - Zhang,Yuan-Yuan, AU - Yu,Bing-Bo, AU - Qiu,Yan-Xia, AU - Wang,Shen-Ming, AU - Tao,Jun, Y1 - 2011/11/28/ PY - 2011/10/25/entrez PY - 2011/10/25/pubmed PY - 2012/6/21/medline SP - 111 EP - 9 JF - Aging cell JO - Aging Cell VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in repairing endothelial injury. Aging is associated with EPC dysfunction. Physical exercise has a beneficial impact on EPC activity. However, whether physical exercise can enhance the endothelial repair capacity of EPCs in healthy men with aging is not clear. Here, we investigated the effects of physical exercise on reendothelialization capacity and CXC chemokine receptor four (CXCR4) signaling in human EPCs. Before and after 12-week exercise, EPCs were isolated from elderly and young men. In vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs in a mouse model of carotid artery injury were measured. The expression of CXCR4 and its downstream signaling target Janus kinase-2 (JAK-2) were determined. Before exercise, in vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs were significantly reduced in elderly men compared with young men. After exercise intervention, in vitro function and in vivo reendothelialization capacity of EPCs from elderly men were markedly enhanced. Physical exercise increased a higher CXCR4 protein expression and higher JAK-2 phosphorylation levels of EPCs. The augmentation in reendothelialization capacity of EPCs was closely correlated with the upregulation of CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling and improvement of endothelial function. This study demonstrates for the first time that physical exercise attenuates age-associated reduction in endothelium-reparative capacity of EPCs by increasing CXCR4/JAK-2 signaling. Our findings provide insight into the novel mechanisms of physical exercise as a lifestyle intervention strategy to promote vascular health in aging population. SN - 1474-9726 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22018014/Physical_exercise_attenuates_age_associated_reduction_in_endothelium_reparative_capacity_of_endothelial_progenitor_cells_by_increasing_CXCR4/JAK_2_signaling_in_healthy_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00758.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -