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Joint effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on the risk of coronary heart disease.
Eur J Prev Cardiol 2013; 20(1):89-97EJ

Abstract

AIMS

To evaluate the single and joint associations of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.

METHODS

Study cohorts included 21,375 Finnish participants who were 25-74 years of age and free of CHD and stroke at baseline.

RESULTS

During a median follow-up period of 10.8 years, 437 participants developed CHD. The sex- and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CHD at different levels of HDL cholesterol [<40 (reference), 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and ≥ 70 mg/dL] were 1.00, 1.00, 0.74, 0.58, and 0.69 (p (trend) = 0.006), respectively. The sex- and multivariable-adjusted HRs of CHD at different levels of LDL cholesterol [<100 (reference), 100-129, 130-159, and ≥ 160 mg/dL] were 1.00, 1.25, 1.92, and 2.65 (p (trend) < 0.001), respectively. In joint analyses, a decreased trend in the incidence rate of CHD with an increasing HDL cholesterol level was consistent in people with any level of LDL cholesterol. Likewise, an increasing trend in incidence of CHD with an increase in the LDL cholesterol level was consistent in subjects with any level of HDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest an inverse association between HDL cholesterol and CHD risk and a direct association between LDL cholesterol and CHD risk, independent of other risk factors. The protective effect of HDL cholesterol on CHD risk is observed at all levels of LDL cholesterol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. gang.hu@pbrc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22023802

Citation

Hu, Gang, et al. "Joint Effect of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol On the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease." European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, vol. 20, no. 1, 2013, pp. 89-97.
Hu G, Cui Y, Jousilahti P, et al. Joint effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on the risk of coronary heart disease. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013;20(1):89-97.
Hu, G., Cui, Y., Jousilahti, P., Sundvall, J., Girman, C. J., Antikainen, R., ... Tuomilehto, J. (2013). Joint effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on the risk of coronary heart disease. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 20(1), pp. 89-97. doi:10.1177/1741826711428242.
Hu G, et al. Joint Effect of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol On the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease. Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013;20(1):89-97. PubMed PMID: 22023802.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Joint effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on the risk of coronary heart disease. AU - Hu,Gang, AU - Cui,Yadong, AU - Jousilahti,Pekka, AU - Sundvall,Jouko, AU - Girman,Cynthia J, AU - Antikainen,Riitta, AU - Laatikainen,Tiina, AU - Tuomilehto,Jaakko, Y1 - 2011/10/24/ PY - 2011/10/26/entrez PY - 2011/10/26/pubmed PY - 2013/6/26/medline SP - 89 EP - 97 JF - European journal of preventive cardiology JO - Eur J Prev Cardiol VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - AIMS: To evaluate the single and joint associations of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. METHODS: Study cohorts included 21,375 Finnish participants who were 25-74 years of age and free of CHD and stroke at baseline. RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 10.8 years, 437 participants developed CHD. The sex- and multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CHD at different levels of HDL cholesterol [<40 (reference), 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and ≥ 70 mg/dL] were 1.00, 1.00, 0.74, 0.58, and 0.69 (p (trend) = 0.006), respectively. The sex- and multivariable-adjusted HRs of CHD at different levels of LDL cholesterol [<100 (reference), 100-129, 130-159, and ≥ 160 mg/dL] were 1.00, 1.25, 1.92, and 2.65 (p (trend) < 0.001), respectively. In joint analyses, a decreased trend in the incidence rate of CHD with an increasing HDL cholesterol level was consistent in people with any level of LDL cholesterol. Likewise, an increasing trend in incidence of CHD with an increase in the LDL cholesterol level was consistent in subjects with any level of HDL cholesterol. CONCLUSION: These results suggest an inverse association between HDL cholesterol and CHD risk and a direct association between LDL cholesterol and CHD risk, independent of other risk factors. The protective effect of HDL cholesterol on CHD risk is observed at all levels of LDL cholesterol. SN - 2047-4881 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22023802/Joint_effect_of_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_and_low_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_on_the_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1741826711428242?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -