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Serum trace elements and heavy metals in polycystic ovary syndrome.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to investigate the serum levels of essential trace elements copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg) and heavy metals cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in the patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

METHODS

A total of 65 (35 patients with PCOS and 30 healthy controls) women were included in the study. Serum Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Mg, Co and Cd levels were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometric method.

RESULTS

Serum Cu and Zn levels were significantly higher, but Mn and Pb levels were lower in patients with PCOS compared with the healthy participants (p < 0.01). There was no difference between patients with PCOS and the controls with respect to the serum levels of Mg, Co and Cd.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the first study investigating serum Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Co, Mg and Cd levels in the patients with PCOS. The serum levels of trace elements and heavy metals might change in patients with PCOS. The findings in this study should be investigated with further trials in order to obtain new insights into PCOS.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey. zehrakurdoglu@hotmail.com

    , ,

    Source

    Human & experimental toxicology 31:5 2012 May pg 452-6

    MeSH

    Adult
    Case-Control Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Metals, Heavy
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Trace Elements
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22027497

    Citation

    Kurdoglu, Z, et al. "Serum Trace Elements and Heavy Metals in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." Human & Experimental Toxicology, vol. 31, no. 5, 2012, pp. 452-6.
    Kurdoglu Z, Kurdoglu M, Demir H, et al. Serum trace elements and heavy metals in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hum Exp Toxicol. 2012;31(5):452-6.
    Kurdoglu, Z., Kurdoglu, M., Demir, H., & Sahin, H. G. (2012). Serum trace elements and heavy metals in polycystic ovary syndrome. Human & Experimental Toxicology, 31(5), pp. 452-6. doi:10.1177/0960327111424299.
    Kurdoglu Z, et al. Serum Trace Elements and Heavy Metals in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Hum Exp Toxicol. 2012;31(5):452-6. PubMed PMID: 22027497.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Serum trace elements and heavy metals in polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Kurdoglu,Z, AU - Kurdoglu,M, AU - Demir,H, AU - Sahin,H G, Y1 - 2011/10/25/ PY - 2011/10/27/entrez PY - 2011/10/27/pubmed PY - 2012/9/26/medline SP - 452 EP - 6 JF - Human & experimental toxicology JO - Hum Exp Toxicol VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the serum levels of essential trace elements copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg) and heavy metals cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co) and lead (Pb) in the patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). METHODS: A total of 65 (35 patients with PCOS and 30 healthy controls) women were included in the study. Serum Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Mg, Co and Cd levels were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometric method. RESULTS: Serum Cu and Zn levels were significantly higher, but Mn and Pb levels were lower in patients with PCOS compared with the healthy participants (p < 0.01). There was no difference between patients with PCOS and the controls with respect to the serum levels of Mg, Co and Cd. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study investigating serum Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb, Co, Mg and Cd levels in the patients with PCOS. The serum levels of trace elements and heavy metals might change in patients with PCOS. The findings in this study should be investigated with further trials in order to obtain new insights into PCOS. SN - 1477-0903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22027497/Serum_trace_elements_and_heavy_metals_in_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0960327111424299?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -