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Appendicular fat mass is positively associated with femoral neck bone mineral density in older women.
Menopause. 2012 Mar; 19(3):311-8.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

In this study, we examined the relationships between body fat accumulation and distribution and bone mineral density (BMD) in older women.

METHODS

A total of 100 healthy white women (mean ± SD age, 68.7 ± 5.5 y) free of medications known to affect bone were enrolled. Lean mass, fat mass (FM), percentage body fat, android FM, gynoid FM, appendicular FM (AFM), appendicular lean mass, and femoral neck BMD were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intake was assessed by 4-day dietary record, and potential renal acid load was also calculated. Performance measures included knee extension and flexion strength measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and a questionnaire. Lactase nonpersistence was defined by the C/T-13910 genotype. Sociodemographic information, lifestyle behaviors, and clinical status were also examined. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that AFM was the most significant positive predictor of femoral neck BMD.

RESULTS

After adjustment for confounders (age, height, age at menopause, potential renal acid load, physical activity, and knee muscle strength), AFM had strong and independent associations with femoral neck BMD (26.4% of variance).

CONCLUSIONS

These data highlight that in older women, localization of FM is more important for bone mass than obesity per se or lean mass. AFM (subcutaneous adiposity) seems to exhibit an independent protective effect on BMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. emarques@fade.up.ptNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22027941

Citation

Marques, Elisa A., et al. "Appendicular Fat Mass Is Positively Associated With Femoral Neck Bone Mineral Density in Older Women." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 19, no. 3, 2012, pp. 311-8.
Marques EA, Moreira P, Wanderley F, et al. Appendicular fat mass is positively associated with femoral neck bone mineral density in older women. Menopause. 2012;19(3):311-8.
Marques, E. A., Moreira, P., Wanderley, F., Pizarro, A. N., Leão-Rosas, J. P., Mota, J., & Carvalho, J. (2012). Appendicular fat mass is positively associated with femoral neck bone mineral density in older women. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 19(3), 311-8. https://doi.org/10.1097/gme.0b013e31822a8d51
Marques EA, et al. Appendicular Fat Mass Is Positively Associated With Femoral Neck Bone Mineral Density in Older Women. Menopause. 2012;19(3):311-8. PubMed PMID: 22027941.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Appendicular fat mass is positively associated with femoral neck bone mineral density in older women. AU - Marques,Elisa A, AU - Moreira,Pedro, AU - Wanderley,Flávia, AU - Pizarro,Andreia N, AU - Leão-Rosas,José P, AU - Mota,Jorge, AU - Carvalho,Joana, PY - 2011/10/27/entrez PY - 2011/10/27/pubmed PY - 2012/7/12/medline SP - 311 EP - 8 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: In this study, we examined the relationships between body fat accumulation and distribution and bone mineral density (BMD) in older women. METHODS: A total of 100 healthy white women (mean ± SD age, 68.7 ± 5.5 y) free of medications known to affect bone were enrolled. Lean mass, fat mass (FM), percentage body fat, android FM, gynoid FM, appendicular FM (AFM), appendicular lean mass, and femoral neck BMD were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intake was assessed by 4-day dietary record, and potential renal acid load was also calculated. Performance measures included knee extension and flexion strength measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and a questionnaire. Lactase nonpersistence was defined by the C/T-13910 genotype. Sociodemographic information, lifestyle behaviors, and clinical status were also examined. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that AFM was the most significant positive predictor of femoral neck BMD. RESULTS: After adjustment for confounders (age, height, age at menopause, potential renal acid load, physical activity, and knee muscle strength), AFM had strong and independent associations with femoral neck BMD (26.4% of variance). CONCLUSIONS: These data highlight that in older women, localization of FM is more important for bone mass than obesity per se or lean mass. AFM (subcutaneous adiposity) seems to exhibit an independent protective effect on BMD. SN - 1530-0374 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22027941/Appendicular_fat_mass_is_positively_associated_with_femoral_neck_bone_mineral_density_in_older_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/gme.0b013e31822a8d51 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -