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Additional value of serum I-FABP levels for evaluating celiac disease activity in children.
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Dec; 46(12):1435-41.SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Addition of a non-invasive marker for intestinal damage to the currently used parameters for celiac disease activity (symptoms, serologic tests and biopsy) might further improve clinical management of celiac disease (CD). Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a cytosolic enterocyte protein and sensitive marker for enterocyte damage in the small intestine. We investigated whether serum I-FABP levels can reliably identify villous atrophy in children with a positive CD antibody screening. Moreover, the recovery of I-FABP levels after gluten free diet (GFD) was studied.

METHODS

I-FABP levels were analyzed retrospectively in 49 children with biopsy proven CD and in 19 patients with a positive screening but without histological confirmation of CD. Blood was collected before biopsy and repeatedly after the onset of GFD.

RESULTS

Initial I-FABP concentrations in CD (median 458 pg/ml) were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated compared to controls (median 20 pg/ml). In the control group, only two of 19 children were found to have elevated I-FABP levels, of which one was subsequently diagnosed with CD after gluten challenge. I-FABP concentrations correlated with severity of villous atrophy. In all CD patients, I-FABP levels decreased quickly after GFD and normalized in 80% of patients within 12 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS

Elevated I-FABP levels accurately predict villous atrophy in children with a positive serologic test for CD (positive predictive value 98%). In addition, measurement of I-FABP enables monitoring the response to GFD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, Netherlands. A.Vreugdenhil@ah.unimaas.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22029621

Citation

Vreugdenhil, Anita C., et al. "Additional Value of Serum I-FABP Levels for Evaluating Celiac Disease Activity in Children." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 46, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1435-41.
Vreugdenhil AC, Wolters VM, Adriaanse MP, et al. Additional value of serum I-FABP levels for evaluating celiac disease activity in children. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011;46(12):1435-41.
Vreugdenhil, A. C., Wolters, V. M., Adriaanse, M. P., Van den Neucker, A. M., van Bijnen, A. A., Houwen, R., & Buurman, W. A. (2011). Additional value of serum I-FABP levels for evaluating celiac disease activity in children. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 46(12), 1435-41. https://doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2011.627447
Vreugdenhil AC, et al. Additional Value of Serum I-FABP Levels for Evaluating Celiac Disease Activity in Children. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011;46(12):1435-41. PubMed PMID: 22029621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Additional value of serum I-FABP levels for evaluating celiac disease activity in children. AU - Vreugdenhil,Anita C, AU - Wolters,Victorien M, AU - Adriaanse,Marlou P, AU - Van den Neucker,Anita M, AU - van Bijnen,Annemarie A, AU - Houwen,Roderick, AU - Buurman,Wim A, Y1 - 2011/10/27/ PY - 2011/10/28/entrez PY - 2011/10/28/pubmed PY - 2012/3/31/medline SP - 1435 EP - 41 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand J Gastroenterol VL - 46 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Addition of a non-invasive marker for intestinal damage to the currently used parameters for celiac disease activity (symptoms, serologic tests and biopsy) might further improve clinical management of celiac disease (CD). Intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a cytosolic enterocyte protein and sensitive marker for enterocyte damage in the small intestine. We investigated whether serum I-FABP levels can reliably identify villous atrophy in children with a positive CD antibody screening. Moreover, the recovery of I-FABP levels after gluten free diet (GFD) was studied. METHODS: I-FABP levels were analyzed retrospectively in 49 children with biopsy proven CD and in 19 patients with a positive screening but without histological confirmation of CD. Blood was collected before biopsy and repeatedly after the onset of GFD. RESULTS: Initial I-FABP concentrations in CD (median 458 pg/ml) were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated compared to controls (median 20 pg/ml). In the control group, only two of 19 children were found to have elevated I-FABP levels, of which one was subsequently diagnosed with CD after gluten challenge. I-FABP concentrations correlated with severity of villous atrophy. In all CD patients, I-FABP levels decreased quickly after GFD and normalized in 80% of patients within 12 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated I-FABP levels accurately predict villous atrophy in children with a positive serologic test for CD (positive predictive value 98%). In addition, measurement of I-FABP enables monitoring the response to GFD. SN - 1502-7708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22029621/Additional_value_of_serum_I_FABP_levels_for_evaluating_celiac_disease_activity_in_children_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00365521.2011.627447 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -