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Ultrafast tracking of sound location changes as revealed by human auditory evoked potentials.
Biol Psychol. 2012 Jan; 89(1):232-9.BP

Abstract

The rapid discrimination of auditory location information enables grouping and selectively attending to specific sound sources. The typical indicator of auditory change detection is the mismatch negativity (MMN) occurring at a latency of about 100-250 ms. However, recent studies have revealed the existence of earlier markers of frequency deviance detection in the middle-latency response (MLR). Here, we measured the MLR and MMN to changes in sound location. Clicks were presented in either the left or right hemifields during oddball (rare 30°-shifts in location), reversed oddball, and control (sounds occurring equiprobably from five locations) conditions. Clicks at deviant locations elicited an MMN and an enhanced Na component of the MLR peaking at 20 ms compared to clicks at standard or control locations. Whereas MMN was not significantly lateralized, the Na effect showed a contralateral dominance. These findings indicate that, also for sound location changes, early detection processes exist upstream of MMN.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior (IR3C), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. sgrimm@ub.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22037091

Citation

Grimm, Sabine, et al. "Ultrafast Tracking of Sound Location Changes as Revealed By Human Auditory Evoked Potentials." Biological Psychology, vol. 89, no. 1, 2012, pp. 232-9.
Grimm S, Recasens M, Althen H, et al. Ultrafast tracking of sound location changes as revealed by human auditory evoked potentials. Biol Psychol. 2012;89(1):232-9.
Grimm, S., Recasens, M., Althen, H., & Escera, C. (2012). Ultrafast tracking of sound location changes as revealed by human auditory evoked potentials. Biological Psychology, 89(1), 232-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2011.10.014
Grimm S, et al. Ultrafast Tracking of Sound Location Changes as Revealed By Human Auditory Evoked Potentials. Biol Psychol. 2012;89(1):232-9. PubMed PMID: 22037091.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultrafast tracking of sound location changes as revealed by human auditory evoked potentials. AU - Grimm,Sabine, AU - Recasens,Marc, AU - Althen,Heike, AU - Escera,Carles, Y1 - 2011/10/25/ PY - 2011/05/11/received PY - 2011/09/14/revised PY - 2011/10/16/accepted PY - 2011/11/1/entrez PY - 2011/11/1/pubmed PY - 2012/4/27/medline SP - 232 EP - 9 JF - Biological psychology JO - Biol Psychol VL - 89 IS - 1 N2 - The rapid discrimination of auditory location information enables grouping and selectively attending to specific sound sources. The typical indicator of auditory change detection is the mismatch negativity (MMN) occurring at a latency of about 100-250 ms. However, recent studies have revealed the existence of earlier markers of frequency deviance detection in the middle-latency response (MLR). Here, we measured the MLR and MMN to changes in sound location. Clicks were presented in either the left or right hemifields during oddball (rare 30°-shifts in location), reversed oddball, and control (sounds occurring equiprobably from five locations) conditions. Clicks at deviant locations elicited an MMN and an enhanced Na component of the MLR peaking at 20 ms compared to clicks at standard or control locations. Whereas MMN was not significantly lateralized, the Na effect showed a contralateral dominance. These findings indicate that, also for sound location changes, early detection processes exist upstream of MMN. SN - 1873-6246 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22037091/Ultrafast_tracking_of_sound_location_changes_as_revealed_by_human_auditory_evoked_potentials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301-0511(11)00266-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -