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Prenatal stress produces sex differences in nest odor preference.
Physiol Behav. 2012 Feb 01; 105(3):850-5.PB

Abstract

Prenatal stress (PS) and early postnatal environment may alter maternal care. Infant rats learn to identify their mother through the association between maternal care and familiar odors. Female Wistar rats were exposed to restraint stress for 30 min, 4 sessions per day, in the last 7 days of pregnancy. At birth, pups were cross-fostered and assigned to the following groups: prenatal non-stressed mothers raising non-stressed pups (NS:NS), prenatal stressed mothers raising non-stressed pups (S:NS), prenatal non-stressed mothers raising stressed pups (NS:S), prenatal stressed mothers raising stressed pups (S:S). Maternal behaviors were assessed during 6 postpartum days. On postnatal day (PND) 7, the behavior of male and female pups was analyzed in the odor preference test; and noradrenaline (NA) activity in olfactory bulb (OB) was measured. The results showed that restraint stress increased plasma levels of corticosterone on gestational day 15. After parturition, PS reduced maternal care, decreasing licking the pups and increasing frequency outside the nest. Female pups from the NS:S, S:NS, S:S groups and male pups from the S:S group showed no nest odor preference. Thus, at day 7, female pups that were submitted to perinatal interventions showed more impairment in the nest odor preference test than male pups. No changes were detected in the NA activity in the OB. In conclusion, repeated restraint stress during the last week of gestation reduces maternal care and reduces preference for a familiar odor in rat pups in a sex-specific manner.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Sarmento Leite, 500, Porto Alegre, RS, CEP 90050-170, Brazil. tiflosoles@yahoo.com.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22037198

Citation

de Souza, Marcelo Alves, et al. "Prenatal Stress Produces Sex Differences in Nest Odor Preference." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 105, no. 3, 2012, pp. 850-5.
de Souza MA, Szawka RE, Centenaro LA, et al. Prenatal stress produces sex differences in nest odor preference. Physiol Behav. 2012;105(3):850-5.
de Souza, M. A., Szawka, R. E., Centenaro, L. A., Diehl, L. A., & Lucion, A. B. (2012). Prenatal stress produces sex differences in nest odor preference. Physiology & Behavior, 105(3), 850-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2011.10.012
de Souza MA, et al. Prenatal Stress Produces Sex Differences in Nest Odor Preference. Physiol Behav. 2012 Feb 1;105(3):850-5. PubMed PMID: 22037198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal stress produces sex differences in nest odor preference. AU - de Souza,Marcelo Alves, AU - Szawka,Raphael Escorsim, AU - Centenaro,Lígia Aline, AU - Diehl,Luisa Amália, AU - Lucion,Aldo Bolten, Y1 - 2011/10/20/ PY - 2011/05/24/received PY - 2011/10/12/revised PY - 2011/10/13/accepted PY - 2011/11/1/entrez PY - 2011/11/1/pubmed PY - 2012/4/17/medline SP - 850 EP - 5 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol Behav VL - 105 IS - 3 N2 - Prenatal stress (PS) and early postnatal environment may alter maternal care. Infant rats learn to identify their mother through the association between maternal care and familiar odors. Female Wistar rats were exposed to restraint stress for 30 min, 4 sessions per day, in the last 7 days of pregnancy. At birth, pups were cross-fostered and assigned to the following groups: prenatal non-stressed mothers raising non-stressed pups (NS:NS), prenatal stressed mothers raising non-stressed pups (S:NS), prenatal non-stressed mothers raising stressed pups (NS:S), prenatal stressed mothers raising stressed pups (S:S). Maternal behaviors were assessed during 6 postpartum days. On postnatal day (PND) 7, the behavior of male and female pups was analyzed in the odor preference test; and noradrenaline (NA) activity in olfactory bulb (OB) was measured. The results showed that restraint stress increased plasma levels of corticosterone on gestational day 15. After parturition, PS reduced maternal care, decreasing licking the pups and increasing frequency outside the nest. Female pups from the NS:S, S:NS, S:S groups and male pups from the S:S group showed no nest odor preference. Thus, at day 7, female pups that were submitted to perinatal interventions showed more impairment in the nest odor preference test than male pups. No changes were detected in the NA activity in the OB. In conclusion, repeated restraint stress during the last week of gestation reduces maternal care and reduces preference for a familiar odor in rat pups in a sex-specific manner. SN - 1873-507X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22037198/Prenatal_stress_produces_sex_differences_in_nest_odor_preference_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031-9384(11)00489-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -