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Physicochemical characterization and water vapor sorption of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted dry powder pulmonary inhalation delivery.
AAPS PharmSciTech. 2011 Dec; 12(4):1420-30.AP

Abstract

Novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders with low water content were successfully produced by organic solution advanced spray drying from dilute solution under various spray-drying conditions. Laser diffraction was used to determine the volumetric particle size and size distribution. Particle morphology and surface morphology was imaged and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Hot-stage microscopy was used to visualize the presence/absence of birefringency before and following particle engineering design pharmaceutical processing, as well as phase transition behavior upon heating. Water content in the solid state was quantified by Karl Fisher (KF) coulometric titration. Solid-state phase transitions and degree of molecular order were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed a correlation between particle morphology, surface morphology, and spray drying pump rate. All advanced spray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate trehalose powders were in the respirable size range and exhibited a unimodal distribution. All spray-dried powders had very low water content, as quantified by KF. The absence of crystallinity in spray-dried particles was reflected in the powder X-ray diffractograms and confirmed by thermal analysis. DSC thermal analysis indicated that the novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited a clear glass transition (T(g)). This is consistent with the formation of the amorphous glassy state. Spray-dried amorphous glassy trehalose inhalable microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited vapor-induced (lyotropic) phase transitions with varying levels of relative humidity as measured by gravimetric vapor sorption at 25°C and 37°C.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences-Drug Development Division, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, 40536-0596, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22038473

Citation

Li, Xiaojian, and Heidi M. Mansour. "Physicochemical Characterization and Water Vapor Sorption of Organic Solution Advanced Spray-dried Inhalable Trehalose Microparticles and Nanoparticles for Targeted Dry Powder Pulmonary Inhalation Delivery." AAPS PharmSciTech, vol. 12, no. 4, 2011, pp. 1420-30.
Li X, Mansour HM. Physicochemical characterization and water vapor sorption of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted dry powder pulmonary inhalation delivery. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2011;12(4):1420-30.
Li, X., & Mansour, H. M. (2011). Physicochemical characterization and water vapor sorption of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted dry powder pulmonary inhalation delivery. AAPS PharmSciTech, 12(4), 1420-30. https://doi.org/10.1208/s12249-011-9704-0
Li X, Mansour HM. Physicochemical Characterization and Water Vapor Sorption of Organic Solution Advanced Spray-dried Inhalable Trehalose Microparticles and Nanoparticles for Targeted Dry Powder Pulmonary Inhalation Delivery. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2011;12(4):1420-30. PubMed PMID: 22038473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physicochemical characterization and water vapor sorption of organic solution advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles for targeted dry powder pulmonary inhalation delivery. AU - Li,Xiaojian, AU - Mansour,Heidi M, Y1 - 2011/10/25/ PY - 2011/06/01/received PY - 2011/09/29/accepted PY - 2011/11/1/entrez PY - 2011/11/1/pubmed PY - 2012/3/27/medline SP - 1420 EP - 30 JF - AAPS PharmSciTech JO - AAPS PharmSciTech VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticulate/nanoparticulate powders with low water content were successfully produced by organic solution advanced spray drying from dilute solution under various spray-drying conditions. Laser diffraction was used to determine the volumetric particle size and size distribution. Particle morphology and surface morphology was imaged and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Hot-stage microscopy was used to visualize the presence/absence of birefringency before and following particle engineering design pharmaceutical processing, as well as phase transition behavior upon heating. Water content in the solid state was quantified by Karl Fisher (KF) coulometric titration. Solid-state phase transitions and degree of molecular order were examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed a correlation between particle morphology, surface morphology, and spray drying pump rate. All advanced spray-dried microparticulate/nanoparticulate trehalose powders were in the respirable size range and exhibited a unimodal distribution. All spray-dried powders had very low water content, as quantified by KF. The absence of crystallinity in spray-dried particles was reflected in the powder X-ray diffractograms and confirmed by thermal analysis. DSC thermal analysis indicated that the novel advanced spray-dried inhalable trehalose microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited a clear glass transition (T(g)). This is consistent with the formation of the amorphous glassy state. Spray-dried amorphous glassy trehalose inhalable microparticles and nanoparticles exhibited vapor-induced (lyotropic) phase transitions with varying levels of relative humidity as measured by gravimetric vapor sorption at 25°C and 37°C. SN - 1530-9932 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22038473/Physicochemical_characterization_and_water_vapor_sorption_of_organic_solution_advanced_spray_dried_inhalable_trehalose_microparticles_and_nanoparticles_for_targeted_dry_powder_pulmonary_inhalation_delivery_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1208/s12249-011-9704-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -