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Diversity of 16S rRNA genes from bacteria of sugarcane rhizosphere soil.
Braz J Med Biol Res. 2011 Dec; 44(12):1215-21.BJ

Abstract

Sugarcane is an important agricultural product of Brazil, with a total production of more than 500 million tons. Knowledge of the bacterial community associated with agricultural crops and the soil status is a decisive step towards understanding how microorganisms influence crop productivity. However, most studies aim to isolate endophytic or rhizosphere bacteria associated with the plant by culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent approaches allow a more comprehensive view of entire bacterial communities in the environment. In the present study, we have used this approach to assess the bacterial community in the rhizosphere soil of sugarcane at different times and under different nitrogen fertilization conditions. At the high taxonomic level, few differences between samples were observed, with the phylum Proteobacteria (29.6%) predominating, followed by Acidobacteria (23.4%), Bacteroidetes (12.1%), Firmicutes (10.2%), and Actinobacteria (5.6%). The exception was the Verrucomicrobia phylum whose prevalence in N-fertilized soils was approximately 0.7% and increased to 5.2% in the non-fertilized soil, suggesting that this group may be an indicator of nitrogen availability in soils. However, at low taxonomic levels a higher diversity was found associated with plants receiving nitrogen fertilizer. Bacillus was the most predominant genus, accounting for 19.7% of all genera observed. Classically reported nitrogen-fixing and/or plant growth-promoting bacterial genera, such as Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Burkholderia were also found although at a lower prevalence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Setor de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brasil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22042267

Citation

Pisa, G, et al. "Diversity of 16S rRNA Genes From Bacteria of Sugarcane Rhizosphere Soil." Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research = Revista Brasileira De Pesquisas Medicas E Biologicas, vol. 44, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1215-21.
Pisa G, Magnani GS, Weber H, et al. Diversity of 16S rRNA genes from bacteria of sugarcane rhizosphere soil. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2011;44(12):1215-21.
Pisa, G., Magnani, G. S., Weber, H., Souza, E. M., Faoro, H., Monteiro, R. A., Daros, E., Baura, V., Bespalhok, J. P., Pedrosa, F. O., & Cruz, L. M. (2011). Diversity of 16S rRNA genes from bacteria of sugarcane rhizosphere soil. Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research = Revista Brasileira De Pesquisas Medicas E Biologicas, 44(12), 1215-21.
Pisa G, et al. Diversity of 16S rRNA Genes From Bacteria of Sugarcane Rhizosphere Soil. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2011;44(12):1215-21. PubMed PMID: 22042267.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diversity of 16S rRNA genes from bacteria of sugarcane rhizosphere soil. AU - Pisa,G, AU - Magnani,G S, AU - Weber,H, AU - Souza,E M, AU - Faoro,H, AU - Monteiro,R A, AU - Daros,E, AU - Baura,V, AU - Bespalhok,J P, AU - Pedrosa,F O, AU - Cruz,L M, Y1 - 2011/11/04/ PY - 2010/12/30/received PY - 2011/10/13/accepted PY - 2011/11/2/entrez PY - 2011/11/2/pubmed PY - 2013/2/23/medline SP - 1215 EP - 21 JF - Brazilian journal of medical and biological research = Revista brasileira de pesquisas medicas e biologicas JO - Braz J Med Biol Res VL - 44 IS - 12 N2 - Sugarcane is an important agricultural product of Brazil, with a total production of more than 500 million tons. Knowledge of the bacterial community associated with agricultural crops and the soil status is a decisive step towards understanding how microorganisms influence crop productivity. However, most studies aim to isolate endophytic or rhizosphere bacteria associated with the plant by culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent approaches allow a more comprehensive view of entire bacterial communities in the environment. In the present study, we have used this approach to assess the bacterial community in the rhizosphere soil of sugarcane at different times and under different nitrogen fertilization conditions. At the high taxonomic level, few differences between samples were observed, with the phylum Proteobacteria (29.6%) predominating, followed by Acidobacteria (23.4%), Bacteroidetes (12.1%), Firmicutes (10.2%), and Actinobacteria (5.6%). The exception was the Verrucomicrobia phylum whose prevalence in N-fertilized soils was approximately 0.7% and increased to 5.2% in the non-fertilized soil, suggesting that this group may be an indicator of nitrogen availability in soils. However, at low taxonomic levels a higher diversity was found associated with plants receiving nitrogen fertilizer. Bacillus was the most predominant genus, accounting for 19.7% of all genera observed. Classically reported nitrogen-fixing and/or plant growth-promoting bacterial genera, such as Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Burkholderia were also found although at a lower prevalence. SN - 1414-431X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22042267/Diversity_of_16S_rRNA_genes_from_bacteria_of_sugarcane_rhizosphere_soil_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -