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Japanese children's amae and mothers' attachment status as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview.
Int J Psychol. 2011 Oct; 46(5):368-76.IJ

Abstract

This study explored whether Japanese mothers' attachment status, as judged by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), would affect the way they perceive their child's amae. Amae, an indigenous Japanese concept of relatedness, has troubled, fascinated, and even mystified scholars across disciplines. In particular, amae has been sometimes misconstrued as the insecure-ambivalent pattern of attachment due to their apparent behavioral similarities. In an attempt to explore an empirical link between attachment and amae, Japanese mothers' (N = 47) views on their six-year-olds' amae were examined based on a brief amae questionnaire, given following the standard AAI. Mothers generally reported their child's amae similarly for questions of frequency (e.g., how often your child exhibits amae behaviors) or situations (e.g., in what circumstances your child most often engages in amae). However, a difference emerged when mothers' free descriptions of their child's amae were examined for the content quality, categorized, and analyzed against their secure/insecure attachment statuses. Secure mothers depicted their child's amae as being more affective, thus more welcoming, whereas insecure mothers depicted their child's typical amae as being more instrumental or manipulative, thus perhaps less welcoming. Japanese mothers' current states of mind with respect to attachment do appear to affect the way they perceive their child's typical amae. Future research on attachment and amae is discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Texas Tech University, Lubbock, USA. kazuko.behrens@ttu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22044308

Citation

Behrens, Kazuko Y., and Kiyomi Kondo-Ikemura. "Japanese Children's Amae and Mothers' Attachment Status as Assessed By the Adult Attachment Interview." International Journal of Psychology : Journal International De Psychologie, vol. 46, no. 5, 2011, pp. 368-76.
Behrens KY, Kondo-Ikemura K. Japanese children's amae and mothers' attachment status as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview. Int J Psychol. 2011;46(5):368-76.
Behrens, K. Y., & Kondo-Ikemura, K. (2011). Japanese children's amae and mothers' attachment status as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview. International Journal of Psychology : Journal International De Psychologie, 46(5), 368-76. https://doi.org/10.1080/00207594.2011.561854
Behrens KY, Kondo-Ikemura K. Japanese Children's Amae and Mothers' Attachment Status as Assessed By the Adult Attachment Interview. Int J Psychol. 2011;46(5):368-76. PubMed PMID: 22044308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Japanese children's amae and mothers' attachment status as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview. AU - Behrens,Kazuko Y, AU - Kondo-Ikemura,Kiyomi, Y1 - 2011/05/24/ PY - 2011/11/3/entrez PY - 2011/11/3/pubmed PY - 2012/4/5/medline SP - 368 EP - 76 JF - International journal of psychology : Journal international de psychologie JO - Int J Psychol VL - 46 IS - 5 N2 - This study explored whether Japanese mothers' attachment status, as judged by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), would affect the way they perceive their child's amae. Amae, an indigenous Japanese concept of relatedness, has troubled, fascinated, and even mystified scholars across disciplines. In particular, amae has been sometimes misconstrued as the insecure-ambivalent pattern of attachment due to their apparent behavioral similarities. In an attempt to explore an empirical link between attachment and amae, Japanese mothers' (N = 47) views on their six-year-olds' amae were examined based on a brief amae questionnaire, given following the standard AAI. Mothers generally reported their child's amae similarly for questions of frequency (e.g., how often your child exhibits amae behaviors) or situations (e.g., in what circumstances your child most often engages in amae). However, a difference emerged when mothers' free descriptions of their child's amae were examined for the content quality, categorized, and analyzed against their secure/insecure attachment statuses. Secure mothers depicted their child's amae as being more affective, thus more welcoming, whereas insecure mothers depicted their child's typical amae as being more instrumental or manipulative, thus perhaps less welcoming. Japanese mothers' current states of mind with respect to attachment do appear to affect the way they perceive their child's typical amae. Future research on attachment and amae is discussed. SN - 1464-066X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22044308/Japanese_children's_amae_and_mothers'_attachment_status_as_assessed_by_the_Adult_Attachment_Interview_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/00207594.2011.561854 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -