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Heme iron from meat and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach.
Eur J Cancer Prev 2012; 21(2):134-8EJ

Abstract

Iron can cause oxidative stress and DNA damage, and heme iron can catalyze endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds, which are potent carcinogens. Dietary iron promotes esophageal cancer incidence in animal studies and has been identified as a growth factor for Helicobacter pylori, an established risk factor for stomach cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (n=124) and stomach (n=154) and 449 controls in Nebraska. Heme iron and total iron intake were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire and databases of heme and total iron. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for known risk factors. Esophageal cancer was positively associated with higher intakes of heme iron (ORQ4 vs. Q1=3.04, 95% CI: 1.20-7.72; P trend=0.009) and total iron from meat sources (ORQ4 vs. Q1=2.67, 95% CI: 0.99-7.16; P trend=0.050). Risk of stomach cancer was elevated among those with higher intakes of heme iron (ORQ4 vs.Q1=1.99, 95% CI: 1.00-3.95; P trend=0.17) and total iron from meat (OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.14-4.46; P trend=0.11). Iron intake from all dietary sources was not significantly associated with risk of either cancer. Our results suggest that high intakes of heme and iron from meat may be important dietary risk factors for esophageal and stomach cancer and may partly explain associations with red meat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Human Services, Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch , National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-7240, USA. wardm@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22044848

Citation

Ward, Mary H., et al. "Heme Iron From Meat and Risk of Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus and Stomach." European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), vol. 21, no. 2, 2012, pp. 134-8.
Ward MH, Cross AJ, Abnet CC, et al. Heme iron from meat and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2012;21(2):134-8.
Ward, M. H., Cross, A. J., Abnet, C. C., Sinha, R., Markin, R. S., & Weisenburger, D. D. (2012). Heme iron from meat and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach. European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), 21(2), pp. 134-8. doi:10.1097/CEJ.0b013e32834c9b6c.
Ward MH, et al. Heme Iron From Meat and Risk of Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus and Stomach. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2012;21(2):134-8. PubMed PMID: 22044848.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heme iron from meat and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach. AU - Ward,Mary H, AU - Cross,Amanda J, AU - Abnet,Christian C, AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Markin,Rodney S, AU - Weisenburger,Dennis D, PY - 2011/11/3/entrez PY - 2011/11/3/pubmed PY - 2012/5/9/medline SP - 134 EP - 8 JF - European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) JO - Eur. J. Cancer Prev. VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Iron can cause oxidative stress and DNA damage, and heme iron can catalyze endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds, which are potent carcinogens. Dietary iron promotes esophageal cancer incidence in animal studies and has been identified as a growth factor for Helicobacter pylori, an established risk factor for stomach cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (n=124) and stomach (n=154) and 449 controls in Nebraska. Heme iron and total iron intake were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire and databases of heme and total iron. We used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for known risk factors. Esophageal cancer was positively associated with higher intakes of heme iron (ORQ4 vs. Q1=3.04, 95% CI: 1.20-7.72; P trend=0.009) and total iron from meat sources (ORQ4 vs. Q1=2.67, 95% CI: 0.99-7.16; P trend=0.050). Risk of stomach cancer was elevated among those with higher intakes of heme iron (ORQ4 vs.Q1=1.99, 95% CI: 1.00-3.95; P trend=0.17) and total iron from meat (OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.14-4.46; P trend=0.11). Iron intake from all dietary sources was not significantly associated with risk of either cancer. Our results suggest that high intakes of heme and iron from meat may be important dietary risk factors for esophageal and stomach cancer and may partly explain associations with red meat. SN - 1473-5709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22044848/Heme_iron_from_meat_and_risk_of_adenocarcinoma_of_the_esophagus_and_stomach_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0b013e32834c9b6c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -