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In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity.
Virology. 2012 Jan 05; 422(1):105-13.V

Abstract

Acquisition of α2-6 sialoside receptor specificity by α2-3 specific highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) is thought to be a prerequisite for efficient transmission in humans. By in vitro selection for binding α2-6 sialosides, we identified four variant viruses with amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (S227N, D187G, E190G, and Q196R) that revealed modestly increased α2-6 and minimally decreased α2-3 binding by glycan array analysis. However, a mutant virus combining Q196R with mutations from previous pandemic viruses (Q226L and G228S) revealed predominantly α2-6 binding. Unlike the wild type H5N1, this mutant virus was transmitted by direct contact in the ferret model although not by airborne respiratory droplets. However, a reassortant virus with the mutant hemagglutinin, a human N2 neuraminidase and internal genes from an H5N1 virus was partially transmitted via respiratory droplets. The complex changes required for airborne transmissibility in ferrets suggest that extensive evolution is needed for H5N1 transmissibility in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22056389

Citation

Chen, Li-Mei, et al. "In Vitro Evolution of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Toward Human-type Receptor Specificity." Virology, vol. 422, no. 1, 2012, pp. 105-13.
Chen LM, Blixt O, Stevens J, et al. In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity. Virology. 2012;422(1):105-13.
Chen, L. M., Blixt, O., Stevens, J., Lipatov, A. S., Davis, C. T., Collins, B. E., Cox, N. J., Paulson, J. C., & Donis, R. O. (2012). In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity. Virology, 422(1), 105-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2011.10.006
Chen LM, et al. In Vitro Evolution of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Toward Human-type Receptor Specificity. Virology. 2012 Jan 5;422(1):105-13. PubMed PMID: 22056389.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro evolution of H5N1 avian influenza virus toward human-type receptor specificity. AU - Chen,Li-Mei, AU - Blixt,Ola, AU - Stevens,James, AU - Lipatov,Aleksandr S, AU - Davis,Charles T, AU - Collins,Brian E, AU - Cox,Nancy J, AU - Paulson,James C, AU - Donis,Ruben O, Y1 - 2011/11/05/ PY - 2011/08/27/received PY - 2011/09/26/revised PY - 2011/10/10/accepted PY - 2011/11/8/entrez PY - 2011/11/8/pubmed PY - 2012/1/21/medline SP - 105 EP - 13 JF - Virology JO - Virology VL - 422 IS - 1 N2 - Acquisition of α2-6 sialoside receptor specificity by α2-3 specific highly-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) is thought to be a prerequisite for efficient transmission in humans. By in vitro selection for binding α2-6 sialosides, we identified four variant viruses with amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (S227N, D187G, E190G, and Q196R) that revealed modestly increased α2-6 and minimally decreased α2-3 binding by glycan array analysis. However, a mutant virus combining Q196R with mutations from previous pandemic viruses (Q226L and G228S) revealed predominantly α2-6 binding. Unlike the wild type H5N1, this mutant virus was transmitted by direct contact in the ferret model although not by airborne respiratory droplets. However, a reassortant virus with the mutant hemagglutinin, a human N2 neuraminidase and internal genes from an H5N1 virus was partially transmitted via respiratory droplets. The complex changes required for airborne transmissibility in ferrets suggest that extensive evolution is needed for H5N1 transmissibility in humans. SN - 1096-0341 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22056389/In_vitro_evolution_of_H5N1_avian_influenza_virus_toward_human_type_receptor_specificity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0042-6822(11)00475-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -