Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A high-fiber diet does not protect against asymptomatic diverticulosis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

The complications of diverticulosis cause considerable morbidity in the United States; health care expenditures for this disorder are estimated to be $2.5 billion per year. Many physicians and patients believe that a high-fiber diet and frequent bowel movements prevent the development of diverticulosis. Evidence for these associations is poor. We sought to determine whether low-fiber or high-fat diets, diets that include large quantities of red meat, constipation, or physical inactivity increase risk for asymptomatic diverticulosis.

METHODS

We performed a cross-sectional study of 2104 participants, 30-80 years old, who underwent outpatient colonoscopy from 1998 to 2010. Diet and physical activity were assessed in interviews using validated instruments.

RESULTS

The prevalence of diverticulosis increased with age, as expected. High intake of fiber did not reduce the prevalence of diverticulosis. Instead, the quartile with the highest fiber intake had a greater prevalence of diverticulosis than the lowest (prevalence ratio = 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.50). Risk increased when calculated based on intake of total fiber, fiber from grains, soluble fiber, and insoluble fiber. Constipation was not a risk factor. Compared to individuals with <7 bowel movements per week, individuals with >15 bowel movements per week had a 70% greater risk for diverticulosis (prevalence ratio = 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-2.34). Neither physical inactivity nor intake of fat or red meat was associated with diverticulosis.

CONCLUSIONS

A high-fiber diet and increased frequency of bowel movements are associated with greater, rather than lower, prevalence of diverticulosis. Hypotheses regarding risk factors for asymptomatic diverticulosis should be reconsidered.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7555, USA.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Gastroenterology 142:2 2012 Feb pg 266-72.e1

    MeSH

    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Asymptomatic Diseases
    Constipation
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Diet Surveys
    Diet, High-Fat
    Dietary Fiber
    Diverticulosis, Colonic
    Female
    Humans
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Motor Activity
    Poisson Distribution
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors
    Sedentary Behavior
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22062360

    Citation

    Peery, Anne F., et al. "A High-fiber Diet Does Not Protect Against Asymptomatic Diverticulosis." Gastroenterology, vol. 142, no. 2, 2012, pp. 266-72.e1.
    Peery AF, Barrett PR, Park D, et al. A high-fiber diet does not protect against asymptomatic diverticulosis. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(2):266-72.e1.
    Peery, A. F., Barrett, P. R., Park, D., Rogers, A. J., Galanko, J. A., Martin, C. F., & Sandler, R. S. (2012). A high-fiber diet does not protect against asymptomatic diverticulosis. Gastroenterology, 142(2), pp. 266-72.e1. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2011.10.035.
    Peery AF, et al. A High-fiber Diet Does Not Protect Against Asymptomatic Diverticulosis. Gastroenterology. 2012;142(2):266-72.e1. PubMed PMID: 22062360.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A high-fiber diet does not protect against asymptomatic diverticulosis. AU - Peery,Anne F, AU - Barrett,Patrick R, AU - Park,Doyun, AU - Rogers,Albert J, AU - Galanko,Joseph A, AU - Martin,Christopher F, AU - Sandler,Robert S, Y1 - 2011/11/04/ PY - 2011/06/17/received PY - 2011/10/05/revised PY - 2011/10/24/accepted PY - 2011/11/9/entrez PY - 2011/11/9/pubmed PY - 2012/5/9/medline SP - 266 EP - 72.e1 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 142 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: The complications of diverticulosis cause considerable morbidity in the United States; health care expenditures for this disorder are estimated to be $2.5 billion per year. Many physicians and patients believe that a high-fiber diet and frequent bowel movements prevent the development of diverticulosis. Evidence for these associations is poor. We sought to determine whether low-fiber or high-fat diets, diets that include large quantities of red meat, constipation, or physical inactivity increase risk for asymptomatic diverticulosis. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 2104 participants, 30-80 years old, who underwent outpatient colonoscopy from 1998 to 2010. Diet and physical activity were assessed in interviews using validated instruments. RESULTS: The prevalence of diverticulosis increased with age, as expected. High intake of fiber did not reduce the prevalence of diverticulosis. Instead, the quartile with the highest fiber intake had a greater prevalence of diverticulosis than the lowest (prevalence ratio = 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.50). Risk increased when calculated based on intake of total fiber, fiber from grains, soluble fiber, and insoluble fiber. Constipation was not a risk factor. Compared to individuals with <7 bowel movements per week, individuals with >15 bowel movements per week had a 70% greater risk for diverticulosis (prevalence ratio = 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-2.34). Neither physical inactivity nor intake of fat or red meat was associated with diverticulosis. CONCLUSIONS: A high-fiber diet and increased frequency of bowel movements are associated with greater, rather than lower, prevalence of diverticulosis. Hypotheses regarding risk factors for asymptomatic diverticulosis should be reconsidered. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22062360/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(11)01509-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -