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Intake of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids in relation to risk of uterine leiomyomata.
Am J Clin Nutr 2011; 94(6):1620-31AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

US black women have higher rates of uterine leiomyomata (UL) and lower intakes of fruit and vegetables than do white women. Whether fruit and vegetable intake is associated with UL in black women has not been studied.

OBJECTIVE

We assessed the association of dietary intake of fruit, vegetables, carotenoids, folate, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and E with UL in the Black Women's Health Study.

DESIGN

In this prospective cohort study, we followed 22,583 premenopausal women for incident UL (1997-2009). Diet was estimated by using food-frequency questionnaires in 1995 and 2001. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for the association between each dietary variable (in quintiles) and UL.

RESULTS

There were 6627 incident cases of UL diagnosed by ultrasonography (n = 4346) or surgery (n = 2281). Fruit and vegetable intake was inversely associated with UL (≥4 compared with <1 serving/d; IRR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.98; P-trend = 0.03). The association was stronger for fruit (≥2 servings/d compared with <2 servings/wk; IRR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.98; P-trend = 0.07) than for vegetables (≥2 servings/d compared with <4 servings/wk: IRR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.05; P-trend = 0.51). Citrus fruit intake was inversely associated with UL (≥3 servings/wk compared with <1 serving/mo: IRR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.00; P-trend = 0.01). The inverse association for dietary vitamin A (upper compared with lower quintiles: IRR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01) appeared to be driven by preformed vitamin A (animal sources), not provitamin A (fruit and vegetable sources). UL was not materially associated with dietary intake of vitamins C and E, folate, fiber, or any of the carotenoids, including lycopene.

CONCLUSION

These data suggest a reduced risk of UL among women with a greater dietary intake of fruit and preformed vitamin A.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, MA 02215, USA. lwise@bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22071705

Citation

Wise, Lauren A., et al. "Intake of Fruit, Vegetables, and Carotenoids in Relation to Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 94, no. 6, 2011, pp. 1620-31.
Wise LA, Radin RG, Palmer JR, et al. Intake of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids in relation to risk of uterine leiomyomata. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;94(6):1620-31.
Wise, L. A., Radin, R. G., Palmer, J. R., Kumanyika, S. K., Boggs, D. A., & Rosenberg, L. (2011). Intake of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids in relation to risk of uterine leiomyomata. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 94(6), pp. 1620-31. doi:10.3945/ajcn.111.016600.
Wise LA, et al. Intake of Fruit, Vegetables, and Carotenoids in Relation to Risk of Uterine Leiomyomata. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;94(6):1620-31. PubMed PMID: 22071705.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids in relation to risk of uterine leiomyomata. AU - Wise,Lauren A, AU - Radin,Rose G, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Kumanyika,Shiriki K, AU - Boggs,Deborah A, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, Y1 - 2011/11/09/ PY - 2011/11/11/entrez PY - 2011/11/11/pubmed PY - 2012/2/4/medline SP - 1620 EP - 31 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 94 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: US black women have higher rates of uterine leiomyomata (UL) and lower intakes of fruit and vegetables than do white women. Whether fruit and vegetable intake is associated with UL in black women has not been studied. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the association of dietary intake of fruit, vegetables, carotenoids, folate, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and E with UL in the Black Women's Health Study. DESIGN: In this prospective cohort study, we followed 22,583 premenopausal women for incident UL (1997-2009). Diet was estimated by using food-frequency questionnaires in 1995 and 2001. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for the association between each dietary variable (in quintiles) and UL. RESULTS: There were 6627 incident cases of UL diagnosed by ultrasonography (n = 4346) or surgery (n = 2281). Fruit and vegetable intake was inversely associated with UL (≥4 compared with <1 serving/d; IRR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.98; P-trend = 0.03). The association was stronger for fruit (≥2 servings/d compared with <2 servings/wk; IRR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.98; P-trend = 0.07) than for vegetables (≥2 servings/d compared with <4 servings/wk: IRR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.05; P-trend = 0.51). Citrus fruit intake was inversely associated with UL (≥3 servings/wk compared with <1 serving/mo: IRR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.86, 1.00; P-trend = 0.01). The inverse association for dietary vitamin A (upper compared with lower quintiles: IRR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.97; P-trend = 0.01) appeared to be driven by preformed vitamin A (animal sources), not provitamin A (fruit and vegetable sources). UL was not materially associated with dietary intake of vitamins C and E, folate, fiber, or any of the carotenoids, including lycopene. CONCLUSION: These data suggest a reduced risk of UL among women with a greater dietary intake of fruit and preformed vitamin A. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22071705/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.111.016600 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -