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Increased risk of leg motor restlessness but not RLS in early Parkinson disease.
Neurology. 2011 Nov 29; 77(22):1941-6.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study explores the risk and correlates of leg restlessness in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD) as compared to control subjects matched for age and gender.

METHODS

A total of 200 drug-naive patients with early, unmedicated PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 173 age- and gender-matched control subjects were assessed for leg restlessness by structured interviews, clinical examination, and blood samples. All subjects were Caucasian. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) was diagnosed according to the essential diagnostic criteria.

RESULTS

More patients (81 of 200, 40.5%) than controls (31 of 173, 17.9%) reported leg restlessness (p < 0.001). Thirty-one (15.5%) of these patients with PD and 16 (9.2%) control subjects met RLS criteria (p = 0.07). A total of 21 (12.5%) patients and 12 (6.9%) controls with RLS remained after the exclusion of potential RLS mimics and 26 patients vs 10 control subjects with leg motor restlessness (LMR), leading to a relative risk for RLS of 1.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-3.43, p = 0.089) and 2.84 for LMR (95% CI 1.43-5.61, p = 0.001) in PD. Except for increased sleep disturbances in patients with RLS and increased Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores for patients with RLS or LMR there were no other major differences in relevant blood tests, motor or cognitive function between PD with and without RLS or LMR.

CONCLUSION

LMR and not RLS occurs with a near 3-fold higher risk as compared to controls in early PD. The findings underline a need for more accurate assessments of RLS in PD and support the notion that RLS and PD are different entities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Pb 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. gjmi@sus.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22076542

Citation

Gjerstad, M D., et al. "Increased Risk of Leg Motor Restlessness but Not RLS in Early Parkinson Disease." Neurology, vol. 77, no. 22, 2011, pp. 1941-6.
Gjerstad MD, Tysnes OB, Larsen JP. Increased risk of leg motor restlessness but not RLS in early Parkinson disease. Neurology. 2011;77(22):1941-6.
Gjerstad, M. D., Tysnes, O. B., & Larsen, J. P. (2011). Increased risk of leg motor restlessness but not RLS in early Parkinson disease. Neurology, 77(22), 1941-6. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e31823a0cc8
Gjerstad MD, Tysnes OB, Larsen JP. Increased Risk of Leg Motor Restlessness but Not RLS in Early Parkinson Disease. Neurology. 2011 Nov 29;77(22):1941-6. PubMed PMID: 22076542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased risk of leg motor restlessness but not RLS in early Parkinson disease. AU - Gjerstad,M D, AU - Tysnes,O B, AU - Larsen,J P, Y1 - 2011/11/09/ PY - 2011/11/15/entrez PY - 2011/11/15/pubmed PY - 2012/1/26/medline SP - 1941 EP - 6 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 77 IS - 22 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study explores the risk and correlates of leg restlessness in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD) as compared to control subjects matched for age and gender. METHODS: A total of 200 drug-naive patients with early, unmedicated PD derived from a population-based incident cohort and 173 age- and gender-matched control subjects were assessed for leg restlessness by structured interviews, clinical examination, and blood samples. All subjects were Caucasian. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) was diagnosed according to the essential diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: More patients (81 of 200, 40.5%) than controls (31 of 173, 17.9%) reported leg restlessness (p < 0.001). Thirty-one (15.5%) of these patients with PD and 16 (9.2%) control subjects met RLS criteria (p = 0.07). A total of 21 (12.5%) patients and 12 (6.9%) controls with RLS remained after the exclusion of potential RLS mimics and 26 patients vs 10 control subjects with leg motor restlessness (LMR), leading to a relative risk for RLS of 1.76 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90-3.43, p = 0.089) and 2.84 for LMR (95% CI 1.43-5.61, p = 0.001) in PD. Except for increased sleep disturbances in patients with RLS and increased Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores for patients with RLS or LMR there were no other major differences in relevant blood tests, motor or cognitive function between PD with and without RLS or LMR. CONCLUSION: LMR and not RLS occurs with a near 3-fold higher risk as compared to controls in early PD. The findings underline a need for more accurate assessments of RLS in PD and support the notion that RLS and PD are different entities. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22076542/Increased_risk_of_leg_motor_restlessness_but_not_RLS_in_early_Parkinson_disease_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=22076542 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -