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Perception of social participation in borderline personality disorder.
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Nov-Dec; 19(6):473-80.CP

Abstract

Interpersonal dysfunction is a key feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Distorted perception of participation in social situations and altered emotional responses could contribute to these typical interpersonal problems in BPD. Thirty patients with BPD were compared with a healthy control group (n = 30) in their perceptions and subjective emotional reactions to situations of social inclusion and exclusion. Participants played Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing paradigm, in which social inclusion and exclusion are experimentally induced. Control participants reacted with an increase in sadness, anger and overall negative affect when excluded. In BPD patients, social exclusion also induced anger, while general participating in the game seemed to reduce levels of sadness. Compared with healthy controls, BPD patients felt more readily excluded independent of the condition of inclusion or exclusion. In conclusion, patients with BPD displayed a negative bias toward perceived participation in social situations. Key PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: Patients with BPD have a biased perception for exclusion. Virtual ball-tossing games can be used to induce anger in patients with BPD. Participating in a virtual ball-tossing game may reduce levels of sadness in BPD in the short term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany. b.renneberg@fu-berlin.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22076727

Citation

Renneberg, Babette, et al. "Perception of Social Participation in Borderline Personality Disorder." Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, vol. 19, no. 6, 2012, pp. 473-80.
Renneberg B, Herm K, Hahn A, et al. Perception of social participation in borderline personality disorder. Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012;19(6):473-80.
Renneberg, B., Herm, K., Hahn, A., Staebler, K., Lammers, C. H., & Roepke, S. (2012). Perception of social participation in borderline personality disorder. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 19(6), 473-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.772
Renneberg B, et al. Perception of Social Participation in Borderline Personality Disorder. Clin Psychol Psychother. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):473-80. PubMed PMID: 22076727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of social participation in borderline personality disorder. AU - Renneberg,Babette, AU - Herm,Kerstin, AU - Hahn,Adam, AU - Staebler,Katja, AU - Lammers,Claas-Hinrich, AU - Roepke,Stefan, Y1 - 2011/08/24/ PY - 2011/11/15/entrez PY - 2011/11/15/pubmed PY - 2013/5/17/medline SP - 473 EP - 80 JF - Clinical psychology & psychotherapy JO - Clin Psychol Psychother VL - 19 IS - 6 N2 - Interpersonal dysfunction is a key feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Distorted perception of participation in social situations and altered emotional responses could contribute to these typical interpersonal problems in BPD. Thirty patients with BPD were compared with a healthy control group (n = 30) in their perceptions and subjective emotional reactions to situations of social inclusion and exclusion. Participants played Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing paradigm, in which social inclusion and exclusion are experimentally induced. Control participants reacted with an increase in sadness, anger and overall negative affect when excluded. In BPD patients, social exclusion also induced anger, while general participating in the game seemed to reduce levels of sadness. Compared with healthy controls, BPD patients felt more readily excluded independent of the condition of inclusion or exclusion. In conclusion, patients with BPD displayed a negative bias toward perceived participation in social situations. Key PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: Patients with BPD have a biased perception for exclusion. Virtual ball-tossing games can be used to induce anger in patients with BPD. Participating in a virtual ball-tossing game may reduce levels of sadness in BPD in the short term. SN - 1099-0879 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22076727/Perception_of_social_participation_in_borderline_personality_disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.772 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -