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The contribution of milk and milk products to micronutrient density and affordability of the U.S. diet.
J Am Coll Nutr 2011; 30(5 Suppl 1):422S-8SJA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To be successful, dietary guidance needs to identify foods that are nutrient rich, affordable, and appealing. Analyses of dietary surveys on "what we eat in America" can now be supplemented by analyses of nutrient density as well as nutrient cost.

OBJECTIVE

To explore the relative contribution of 9 food groups to energy and nutrient intakes and to assess the relative cost of selected nutrients by major food group.

METHOD

Dietary intake data were provided by the 4 cycles of the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008). Research on the nutritive value and cost of U.S. foods was made possible by the merging of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS 2.0) with the USDA food prices database. Nutrient densities were calculated per 100 kcal. Nutrient costs were calculated as the dollar cost of meeting 10% daily value for a given nutrient.

RESULTS

Despite their low energy contribution (10%-13% of energy), milk and milk products contributed 47% of calcium, 42% of retinol, and 65% of vitamin D to the diets of children and adults. Milk and milk products were among the top sources of riboflavin, phosphorous, and vitamin B(12). Cost analyses showed that milk and milk products were by far the lowest-cost source of dietary calcium and were among the lowest-cost sources of riboflavin and vitamin B(12). Vegetables and fruit were the lowest-cost sources of vitamin C, whereas dry beans and legumes were the lowest-cost sources of fiber.

CONCLUSION

The nutrients-per-calorie and nutrient cost metrics can help identify affordable nutrient-rich foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Public Health Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-3410, USA. adamdrew@u.washington.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22081688

Citation

Drewnowski, Adam. "The Contribution of Milk and Milk Products to Micronutrient Density and Affordability of the U.S. Diet." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 30, no. 5 Suppl 1, 2011, 422S-8S.
Drewnowski A. The contribution of milk and milk products to micronutrient density and affordability of the U.S. diet. J Am Coll Nutr. 2011;30(5 Suppl 1):422S-8S.
Drewnowski, A. (2011). The contribution of milk and milk products to micronutrient density and affordability of the U.S. diet. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 30(5 Suppl 1), 422S-8S.
Drewnowski A. The Contribution of Milk and Milk Products to Micronutrient Density and Affordability of the U.S. Diet. J Am Coll Nutr. 2011;30(5 Suppl 1):422S-8S. PubMed PMID: 22081688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The contribution of milk and milk products to micronutrient density and affordability of the U.S. diet. A1 - Drewnowski,Adam, PY - 2011/11/15/entrez PY - 2011/12/7/pubmed PY - 2012/3/8/medline SP - 422S EP - 8S JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 30 IS - 5 Suppl 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: To be successful, dietary guidance needs to identify foods that are nutrient rich, affordable, and appealing. Analyses of dietary surveys on "what we eat in America" can now be supplemented by analyses of nutrient density as well as nutrient cost. OBJECTIVE: To explore the relative contribution of 9 food groups to energy and nutrient intakes and to assess the relative cost of selected nutrients by major food group. METHOD: Dietary intake data were provided by the 4 cycles of the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008). Research on the nutritive value and cost of U.S. foods was made possible by the merging of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS 2.0) with the USDA food prices database. Nutrient densities were calculated per 100 kcal. Nutrient costs were calculated as the dollar cost of meeting 10% daily value for a given nutrient. RESULTS: Despite their low energy contribution (10%-13% of energy), milk and milk products contributed 47% of calcium, 42% of retinol, and 65% of vitamin D to the diets of children and adults. Milk and milk products were among the top sources of riboflavin, phosphorous, and vitamin B(12). Cost analyses showed that milk and milk products were by far the lowest-cost source of dietary calcium and were among the lowest-cost sources of riboflavin and vitamin B(12). Vegetables and fruit were the lowest-cost sources of vitamin C, whereas dry beans and legumes were the lowest-cost sources of fiber. CONCLUSION: The nutrients-per-calorie and nutrient cost metrics can help identify affordable nutrient-rich foods. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22081688/The_contribution_of_milk_and_milk_products_to_micronutrient_density_and_affordability_of_the_U_S__diet_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2011.10719986 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -