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Excessive gestational weight gain predicts large for gestational age neonates independent of maternal body mass index.
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012 May; 25(5):538-42.JM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on large-for-gestational-age (LGA) birth weight (≥90th % ile).

METHODS

We examined 4321 mother-infant pairs from the Ottawa and Kingston (OaK) birth cohort. Multivariate logistic regression (controlling for gestational and maternal age, pre-pregnancy weight, parity, smoking) were performed and odds ratios (ORs) calculated.

RESULTS

Prior to pregnancy, a total of 23.7% of women were overweight and 16.2% obese. Only 29.3% of women met GWG targets recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), whereas 57.7% exceeded the guidelines. Adjusting for smoking, parity, age, maternal height, and achieving the IOM's recommended GWG, overweight (OR 1.99; 95%CI 1.17-3.37) or obese (OR 2.64; 95% CI 1.59-4.39) pre-pregnancy was associated with a higher rate of LGA compared to women with normal BMI. In the same model, exceeding GWG guidelines was associated with higher rates of LGA (OR 2.86; 95% CI 2.09-3.92), as was parity (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.22-1.82). Smoking (OR 0.53; 95%CI 0.35-0.79) was associated with decreased rates of LGA. The adjusted association with LGA was also estimated for women who exceeded the GWG guidelines and were overweight (OR 3.59; 95% CI 2.60-4.95) or obese (OR 6.71; 95% CI 4.83-9.31).

CONCLUSION

Pregravid overweight or obesity and gaining in excess of the IOM 2009 GWG guidelines strongly increase a woman's chance of having a larger baby. Lifestyle interventions that aim to optimize GWG by incorporating healthy eating and exercise strategies during pregnancy should be investigated to determine their effects on LGA neonates and down-stream child obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22081936

Citation

Ferraro, Z M., et al. "Excessive Gestational Weight Gain Predicts Large for Gestational Age Neonates Independent of Maternal Body Mass Index." The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, vol. 25, no. 5, 2012, pp. 538-42.
Ferraro ZM, Barrowman N, Prud'homme D, et al. Excessive gestational weight gain predicts large for gestational age neonates independent of maternal body mass index. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012;25(5):538-42.
Ferraro, Z. M., Barrowman, N., Prud'homme, D., Walker, M., Wen, S. W., Rodger, M., & Adamo, K. B. (2012). Excessive gestational weight gain predicts large for gestational age neonates independent of maternal body mass index. The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, 25(5), 538-42. https://doi.org/10.3109/14767058.2011.638953
Ferraro ZM, et al. Excessive Gestational Weight Gain Predicts Large for Gestational Age Neonates Independent of Maternal Body Mass Index. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2012;25(5):538-42. PubMed PMID: 22081936.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excessive gestational weight gain predicts large for gestational age neonates independent of maternal body mass index. AU - Ferraro,Z M, AU - Barrowman,N, AU - Prud'homme,D, AU - Walker,M, AU - Wen,S W, AU - Rodger,M, AU - Adamo,K B, Y1 - 2011/12/21/ PY - 2011/11/16/entrez PY - 2011/11/16/pubmed PY - 2012/8/7/medline SP - 538 EP - 42 JF - The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians JO - J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med VL - 25 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on large-for-gestational-age (LGA) birth weight (≥90th % ile). METHODS: We examined 4321 mother-infant pairs from the Ottawa and Kingston (OaK) birth cohort. Multivariate logistic regression (controlling for gestational and maternal age, pre-pregnancy weight, parity, smoking) were performed and odds ratios (ORs) calculated. RESULTS: Prior to pregnancy, a total of 23.7% of women were overweight and 16.2% obese. Only 29.3% of women met GWG targets recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), whereas 57.7% exceeded the guidelines. Adjusting for smoking, parity, age, maternal height, and achieving the IOM's recommended GWG, overweight (OR 1.99; 95%CI 1.17-3.37) or obese (OR 2.64; 95% CI 1.59-4.39) pre-pregnancy was associated with a higher rate of LGA compared to women with normal BMI. In the same model, exceeding GWG guidelines was associated with higher rates of LGA (OR 2.86; 95% CI 2.09-3.92), as was parity (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.22-1.82). Smoking (OR 0.53; 95%CI 0.35-0.79) was associated with decreased rates of LGA. The adjusted association with LGA was also estimated for women who exceeded the GWG guidelines and were overweight (OR 3.59; 95% CI 2.60-4.95) or obese (OR 6.71; 95% CI 4.83-9.31). CONCLUSION: Pregravid overweight or obesity and gaining in excess of the IOM 2009 GWG guidelines strongly increase a woman's chance of having a larger baby. Lifestyle interventions that aim to optimize GWG by incorporating healthy eating and exercise strategies during pregnancy should be investigated to determine their effects on LGA neonates and down-stream child obesity. SN - 1476-4954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22081936/Excessive_gestational_weight_gain_predicts_large_for_gestational_age_neonates_independent_of_maternal_body_mass_index_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/14767058.2011.638953 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -