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Cranberry proanthocyanidins: natural weapons against periodontal diseases.

Abstract

Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) is known to have a beneficial effect on several aspects of human health. Proanthocyanidins (PACs), the most abundant flavonoids extracted from red cranberry fruits, have been reported to possess antimicrobial, antiadhesion, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent in vitro studies have shown that cranberry PACs may be potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and management of periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of bacterial origin affecting tooth-supporting tissues. After presenting an overview of cranberry phytochemicals and their potential for human health benefits, this review will focus on the effects of cranberry PACs on connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone destruction, as well as their potential for controlling periodontal diseases. Possible mechanisms of action of cranberry PACs include the inhibition of (i) bacterial and host-derived proteolytic enzymes, (ii) host inflammatory response, and (iii) osteoclast differentiation and activity. Given that cranberry PACs have shown interesting properties in in vitro studies, clinical trials are warranted to better evaluate the potential of these molecules for controlling periodontal diseases.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Groupe de Recherche en Écologie Buccale, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Université Laval , Quebec City, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.

    , , ,

    Source

    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry 60:23 2012 Jun 13 pg 5728-35

    MeSH

    Anti-Inflammatory Agents
    Flavonoids
    Fruit
    Humans
    Periodontal Diseases
    Phytochemicals
    Plant Extracts
    Proanthocyanidins
    Vaccinium macrocarpon

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22082264

    Citation

    Feghali, Karine, et al. "Cranberry Proanthocyanidins: Natural Weapons Against Periodontal Diseases." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 60, no. 23, 2012, pp. 5728-35.
    Feghali K, Feldman M, La VD, et al. Cranberry proanthocyanidins: natural weapons against periodontal diseases. J Agric Food Chem. 2012;60(23):5728-35.
    Feghali, K., Feldman, M., La, V. D., Santos, J., & Grenier, D. (2012). Cranberry proanthocyanidins: natural weapons against periodontal diseases. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60(23), pp. 5728-35. doi:10.1021/jf203304v.
    Feghali K, et al. Cranberry Proanthocyanidins: Natural Weapons Against Periodontal Diseases. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Jun 13;60(23):5728-35. PubMed PMID: 22082264.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cranberry proanthocyanidins: natural weapons against periodontal diseases. AU - Feghali,Karine, AU - Feldman,Mark, AU - La,Vu Dang, AU - Santos,Juliana, AU - Grenier,Daniel, Y1 - 2011/11/29/ PY - 2011/11/16/entrez PY - 2011/11/16/pubmed PY - 2014/7/19/medline SP - 5728 EP - 35 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J. Agric. Food Chem. VL - 60 IS - 23 N2 - Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) is known to have a beneficial effect on several aspects of human health. Proanthocyanidins (PACs), the most abundant flavonoids extracted from red cranberry fruits, have been reported to possess antimicrobial, antiadhesion, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent in vitro studies have shown that cranberry PACs may be potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and management of periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of bacterial origin affecting tooth-supporting tissues. After presenting an overview of cranberry phytochemicals and their potential for human health benefits, this review will focus on the effects of cranberry PACs on connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone destruction, as well as their potential for controlling periodontal diseases. Possible mechanisms of action of cranberry PACs include the inhibition of (i) bacterial and host-derived proteolytic enzymes, (ii) host inflammatory response, and (iii) osteoclast differentiation and activity. Given that cranberry PACs have shown interesting properties in in vitro studies, clinical trials are warranted to better evaluate the potential of these molecules for controlling periodontal diseases. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22082264/Cranberry_proanthocyanidins:_natural_weapons_against_periodontal_diseases_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf203304v DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -