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The effects of selective consonant amplification on sentence recognition in noise by hearing-impaired listeners.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2011 Nov; 130(5):3028-37.JA

Abstract

Weak consonants (e.g., stops) are more susceptible to noise than vowels, owing partially to their lower intensity. This raises the question whether hearing-impaired (HI) listeners are able to perceive (and utilize effectively) the high-frequency cues present in consonants. To answer this question, HI listeners were presented with clean (noise absent) weak consonants in otherwise noise-corrupted sentences. Results indicated that HI listeners received significant benefit in intelligibility (4 dB decrease in speech reception threshold) when they had access to clean consonant information. At extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels, however, HI listeners received only 64% of the benefit obtained by normal-hearing listeners. This lack of equitable benefit was investigated in Experiment 2 by testing the hypothesis that the high-frequency cues present in consonants were not audible to HI listeners. This was tested by selectively amplifying the noisy consonants while leaving the noisy sonorant sounds (e.g., vowels) unaltered. Listening tests indicated small (∼10%), but statistically significant, improvements in intelligibility at low SNR conditions when the consonants were amplified in the high-frequency region. Selective consonant amplification provided reliable low-frequency acoustic landmarks that in turn facilitated a better lexical segmentation of the speech stream and contributed to the small improvement in intelligibility.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22087930

Citation

Saripella, Rithika, et al. "The Effects of Selective Consonant Amplification On Sentence Recognition in Noise By Hearing-impaired Listeners." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 130, no. 5, 2011, pp. 3028-37.
Saripella R, Loizou PC, Thibodeau L, et al. The effects of selective consonant amplification on sentence recognition in noise by hearing-impaired listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2011;130(5):3028-37.
Saripella, R., Loizou, P. C., Thibodeau, L., & Alford, J. A. (2011). The effects of selective consonant amplification on sentence recognition in noise by hearing-impaired listeners. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 130(5), 3028-37. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3641407
Saripella R, et al. The Effects of Selective Consonant Amplification On Sentence Recognition in Noise By Hearing-impaired Listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2011;130(5):3028-37. PubMed PMID: 22087930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of selective consonant amplification on sentence recognition in noise by hearing-impaired listeners. AU - Saripella,Rithika, AU - Loizou,Philipos C, AU - Thibodeau,Linda, AU - Alford,Jennifer A, PY - 2011/11/18/entrez PY - 2011/11/18/pubmed PY - 2012/4/5/medline SP - 3028 EP - 37 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 130 IS - 5 N2 - Weak consonants (e.g., stops) are more susceptible to noise than vowels, owing partially to their lower intensity. This raises the question whether hearing-impaired (HI) listeners are able to perceive (and utilize effectively) the high-frequency cues present in consonants. To answer this question, HI listeners were presented with clean (noise absent) weak consonants in otherwise noise-corrupted sentences. Results indicated that HI listeners received significant benefit in intelligibility (4 dB decrease in speech reception threshold) when they had access to clean consonant information. At extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels, however, HI listeners received only 64% of the benefit obtained by normal-hearing listeners. This lack of equitable benefit was investigated in Experiment 2 by testing the hypothesis that the high-frequency cues present in consonants were not audible to HI listeners. This was tested by selectively amplifying the noisy consonants while leaving the noisy sonorant sounds (e.g., vowels) unaltered. Listening tests indicated small (∼10%), but statistically significant, improvements in intelligibility at low SNR conditions when the consonants were amplified in the high-frequency region. Selective consonant amplification provided reliable low-frequency acoustic landmarks that in turn facilitated a better lexical segmentation of the speech stream and contributed to the small improvement in intelligibility. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22087930/The_effects_of_selective_consonant_amplification_on_sentence_recognition_in_noise_by_hearing_impaired_listeners_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3641407 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -