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The low rate of bacterial meningitis in children, ages 6 to 18 months, with simple febrile seizures.
Acad Emerg Med. 2011 Nov; 18(11):1114-20.AE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This evidence-based review examines the risk of bacterial meningitis as diagnosed by lumbar puncture (LP) in children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a simple febrile seizure. The study population consists of fully immunized children between ages 6 and 18 months of age with an unremarkable history and normal physical examination.

METHODS

MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies that enrolled children who presented with simple febrile seizure to the ED and had LP performed to rule out meningitis. The primary outcome measure was the risk of bacterial meningitis based on findings of the LP. The secondary outcome was the rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis in children who were pretreated with antibiotics.

RESULTS

Two studies enrolling a total of 150 children met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The overall rate of meningitis was 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0% to 3.0%). The rate of CSF pleocytosis in children who were pretreated with antibiotics was 2.5% (95% CI = 0.0% to 14.0%).

CONCLUSIONS

The sample size of the studies included in this review is too small to draw any definitive conclusion. However, their findings suggest that that the risk of bacterial meningitis in children presenting with simple febrile seizure is very low.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, NY, USA. Jeffrey.Hom@nyumc.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22092892

Citation

Hom, Jeffrey, and Kelly Medwid. "The Low Rate of Bacterial Meningitis in Children, Ages 6 to 18 Months, With Simple Febrile Seizures." Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 18, no. 11, 2011, pp. 1114-20.
Hom J, Medwid K. The low rate of bacterial meningitis in children, ages 6 to 18 months, with simple febrile seizures. Acad Emerg Med. 2011;18(11):1114-20.
Hom, J., & Medwid, K. (2011). The low rate of bacterial meningitis in children, ages 6 to 18 months, with simple febrile seizures. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 18(11), 1114-20. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2011.01216.x
Hom J, Medwid K. The Low Rate of Bacterial Meningitis in Children, Ages 6 to 18 Months, With Simple Febrile Seizures. Acad Emerg Med. 2011;18(11):1114-20. PubMed PMID: 22092892.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The low rate of bacterial meningitis in children, ages 6 to 18 months, with simple febrile seizures. AU - Hom,Jeffrey, AU - Medwid,Kelly, PY - 2011/11/19/entrez PY - 2011/11/19/pubmed PY - 2012/3/30/medline SP - 1114 EP - 20 JF - Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine JO - Acad Emerg Med VL - 18 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This evidence-based review examines the risk of bacterial meningitis as diagnosed by lumbar puncture (LP) in children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a simple febrile seizure. The study population consists of fully immunized children between ages 6 and 18 months of age with an unremarkable history and normal physical examination. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies that enrolled children who presented with simple febrile seizure to the ED and had LP performed to rule out meningitis. The primary outcome measure was the risk of bacterial meningitis based on findings of the LP. The secondary outcome was the rate of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis in children who were pretreated with antibiotics. RESULTS: Two studies enrolling a total of 150 children met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The overall rate of meningitis was 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.0% to 3.0%). The rate of CSF pleocytosis in children who were pretreated with antibiotics was 2.5% (95% CI = 0.0% to 14.0%). CONCLUSIONS: The sample size of the studies included in this review is too small to draw any definitive conclusion. However, their findings suggest that that the risk of bacterial meningitis in children presenting with simple febrile seizure is very low. SN - 1553-2712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22092892/The_low_rate_of_bacterial_meningitis_in_children_ages_6_to_18_months_with_simple_febrile_seizures_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2011.01216.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -