Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Continuity of care between family practice physicians and hospitalist services.
J Healthc Qual 2013 Jan-Feb; 35(1):41-9JH

Abstract

PURPOSE

Hospitalist services are increasing in popularity and fewer primary care providers (PCPs) are caring for patients while hospitalized. Due to concerns with discontinuity of care, this study evaluated communication and medication discrepancies on admission and discharge between PCPs without admitting privileges and hospitalist physicians.

METHODS

This retrospective analysis evaluated patients from a PCP office admitted to hospitalist services from January 2009 through July 2009. Patient charts were evaluated for PCP, age, gender, insurance, modes and timeliness of PCP notification, medications on admission and discharge, and medication discrepancies.

RESULTS

A total of 120 charts were evaluated. Physicians were contacted by receipt of admission summaries for 93% of patients and by phone for 5.8% of patients. Twenty-one percent of admission summaries were received by the PCP after the patient was discharged from the hospital and 7% of discharge summaries were received after the first hospital follow-up with the PCP. Medication errors occurred frequently and the rate increased in patients at least 65 years old, if they had Medicare, Medicaid, or were without insurance coverage.

CONCLUSION

Better communication and documentation of medication regimens are needed to improve continuity of care of patients between outpatient and inpatient settings and avoid potentially harmful medication errors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

West Virginia University School of Pharmacy in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22093050

Citation

McMillan, Ashlee, et al. "Continuity of Care Between Family Practice Physicians and Hospitalist Services." Journal for Healthcare Quality : Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality, vol. 35, no. 1, 2013, pp. 41-9.
McMillan A, Trompeter J, Havrda D, et al. Continuity of care between family practice physicians and hospitalist services. J Healthc Qual. 2013;35(1):41-9.
McMillan, A., Trompeter, J., Havrda, D., & Fox, J. (2013). Continuity of care between family practice physicians and hospitalist services. Journal for Healthcare Quality : Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality, 35(1), pp. 41-9. doi:10.1111/j.1945-1474.2011.00165.x.
McMillan A, et al. Continuity of Care Between Family Practice Physicians and Hospitalist Services. J Healthc Qual. 2013;35(1):41-9. PubMed PMID: 22093050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Continuity of care between family practice physicians and hospitalist services. AU - McMillan,Ashlee, AU - Trompeter,Jessica, AU - Havrda,Dawn, AU - Fox,Jeremy, Y1 - 2011/09/13/ PY - 2011/11/19/entrez PY - 2011/11/19/pubmed PY - 2013/12/16/medline SP - 41 EP - 9 JF - Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality JO - J Healthc Qual VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Hospitalist services are increasing in popularity and fewer primary care providers (PCPs) are caring for patients while hospitalized. Due to concerns with discontinuity of care, this study evaluated communication and medication discrepancies on admission and discharge between PCPs without admitting privileges and hospitalist physicians. METHODS: This retrospective analysis evaluated patients from a PCP office admitted to hospitalist services from January 2009 through July 2009. Patient charts were evaluated for PCP, age, gender, insurance, modes and timeliness of PCP notification, medications on admission and discharge, and medication discrepancies. RESULTS: A total of 120 charts were evaluated. Physicians were contacted by receipt of admission summaries for 93% of patients and by phone for 5.8% of patients. Twenty-one percent of admission summaries were received by the PCP after the patient was discharged from the hospital and 7% of discharge summaries were received after the first hospital follow-up with the PCP. Medication errors occurred frequently and the rate increased in patients at least 65 years old, if they had Medicare, Medicaid, or were without insurance coverage. CONCLUSION: Better communication and documentation of medication regimens are needed to improve continuity of care of patients between outpatient and inpatient settings and avoid potentially harmful medication errors. SN - 1945-1474 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22093050/Continuity_of_care_between_family_practice_physicians_and_hospitalist_services_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1945-1474.2011.00165.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -