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A prospective cohort study of coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer over a 26-year follow-up.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2011; 20(12):2487-95CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coffee has been reported to lower levels of estrogen and insulin, two hormones implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis, but prospective data on the relation between coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer are limited.

METHODS

We prospectively assessed coffee consumption in relation to endometrial cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) with 67,470 female participants aged 34 to 59 in 1980. Cumulative average coffee intake was calculated with all available questionnaires to assess long-term effects. Cox regression models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR), controlling for other risk factors.

RESULTS

Fewer than 4 cups of coffee per day were not associated with endometrial cancer risk. However, women who consumed 4 or more cups of coffee had 25% lower risk of endometrial cancer than those who consumed less than 1 cup per day (multivariable RR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.57-0.97; P(trend) = 0.02). We found the similar association with caffeinated coffee consumption (RR for ≥4 vs. <1 cup/d = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.51-0.95). For decaffeinated coffee consumption, a suggestive inverse association was found among women who consumed 2 or more cups per day versus <1 cup/mo. Tea consumption was not associated with endometrial cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS

These prospective data suggest that four or more cups of coffee per day are associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer.

IMPACT

Drinking of coffee, given its widespread consumption, might be an additional strategy to reduce endometrial cancer risk. However, addition of substantial sugar and cream to coffee could offset any potential benefits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. yje@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22109346

Citation

Je, Youjin, et al. "A Prospective Cohort Study of Coffee Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer Over a 26-year Follow-up." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 20, no. 12, 2011, pp. 2487-95.
Je Y, Hankinson SE, Tworoger SS, et al. A prospective cohort study of coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer over a 26-year follow-up. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(12):2487-95.
Je, Y., Hankinson, S. E., Tworoger, S. S., De Vivo, I., & Giovannucci, E. (2011). A prospective cohort study of coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer over a 26-year follow-up. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 20(12), pp. 2487-95. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0766.
Je Y, et al. A Prospective Cohort Study of Coffee Consumption and Risk of Endometrial Cancer Over a 26-year Follow-up. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011;20(12):2487-95. PubMed PMID: 22109346.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective cohort study of coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer over a 26-year follow-up. AU - Je,Youjin, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Tworoger,Shelley S, AU - De Vivo,Immaculata, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, Y1 - 2011/11/22/ PY - 2011/11/24/entrez PY - 2011/11/24/pubmed PY - 2012/6/19/medline SP - 2487 EP - 95 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 20 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Coffee has been reported to lower levels of estrogen and insulin, two hormones implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis, but prospective data on the relation between coffee consumption and risk of endometrial cancer are limited. METHODS: We prospectively assessed coffee consumption in relation to endometrial cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) with 67,470 female participants aged 34 to 59 in 1980. Cumulative average coffee intake was calculated with all available questionnaires to assess long-term effects. Cox regression models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR), controlling for other risk factors. RESULTS: Fewer than 4 cups of coffee per day were not associated with endometrial cancer risk. However, women who consumed 4 or more cups of coffee had 25% lower risk of endometrial cancer than those who consumed less than 1 cup per day (multivariable RR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.57-0.97; P(trend) = 0.02). We found the similar association with caffeinated coffee consumption (RR for ≥4 vs. <1 cup/d = 0.70; 95% CI = 0.51-0.95). For decaffeinated coffee consumption, a suggestive inverse association was found among women who consumed 2 or more cups per day versus <1 cup/mo. Tea consumption was not associated with endometrial cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: These prospective data suggest that four or more cups of coffee per day are associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer. IMPACT: Drinking of coffee, given its widespread consumption, might be an additional strategy to reduce endometrial cancer risk. However, addition of substantial sugar and cream to coffee could offset any potential benefits. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22109346/A_prospective_cohort_study_of_coffee_consumption_and_risk_of_endometrial_cancer_over_a_26_year_follow_up_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=22109346 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -