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A double-blind, controlled trial in primary care patients with generalized anxiety: a comparison between buspirone and oxazepam.
J Clin Psychiatry 1990; 51 Suppl:40-5JC

Abstract

Two hundred thirty patients with generalized anxiety and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) scores greater than or equal to 18 were subdivided at random, according to a double-blind design, into one group treated with 5-10 mg of oral buspirone t.i.d. or one group treated with 10-20 mg of oral oxazepam t.i.d. for 6 weeks. No anxiolytic treatment was allowed 3 months prior to trial entry. Analysis of demographic variables revealed no significant imbalance between the two treatment groups. Twenty patients were excluded from efficacy analysis because of treatment withdrawal before the first efficacy evaluation on Day 7. Another 4 patients were excluded because they were taking concomitant psychotropic medication. The remaining 206 patients displayed a decrease in HAM-A scores (mean +/- SD) from 23.9 +/- 4.1 to 10.6 +/- 7.7 in the buspirone group and from 23.9 +/- 4.2 to 11.5 +/- 8.0 in the oxazepam group. The two treatment groups were also found to be virtually identical in an "intent to treat" analysis of all 230 patients as well as in other ratings (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Raskin Depression Scale, Covi Anxiety Scale, Physicians Questionnaire, global ratings, and Hopkins Symptom Checklist [HSCL]-56). However, oxazepam was never superior to buspirone in any of the efficacy analyses. Of the 230 patients, 127 spontaneously reported adverse events, including drowsiness, dizziness, headache, nausea, and nervousness. Adverse events were relatively similar in the two groups. In conclusion, buspirone and oxazepam appear to be equally effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety encountered by general practitioners. This outcome, in addition to a previously documented absence of any dependency liability, makes buspirone a clinically important anxiolytic drug.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Primary Care Center, Enköping, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2211567

Citation

Strand, M, et al. "A Double-blind, Controlled Trial in Primary Care Patients With Generalized Anxiety: a Comparison Between Buspirone and Oxazepam." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 51 Suppl, 1990, pp. 40-5.
Strand M, Hetta J, Rosen A, et al. A double-blind, controlled trial in primary care patients with generalized anxiety: a comparison between buspirone and oxazepam. J Clin Psychiatry. 1990;51 Suppl:40-5.
Strand, M., Hetta, J., Rosen, A., Sörensen, S., Malmström, R., Fabian, C., ... Hegen, C. (1990). A double-blind, controlled trial in primary care patients with generalized anxiety: a comparison between buspirone and oxazepam. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 51 Suppl, pp. 40-5.
Strand M, et al. A Double-blind, Controlled Trial in Primary Care Patients With Generalized Anxiety: a Comparison Between Buspirone and Oxazepam. J Clin Psychiatry. 1990;51 Suppl:40-5. PubMed PMID: 2211567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A double-blind, controlled trial in primary care patients with generalized anxiety: a comparison between buspirone and oxazepam. AU - Strand,M, AU - Hetta,J, AU - Rosen,A, AU - Sörensen,S, AU - Malmström,R, AU - Fabian,C, AU - Marits,K, AU - Vetterskog,K, AU - Liljestrand,A G, AU - Hegen,C, PY - 1990/9/1/pubmed PY - 1990/9/1/medline PY - 1990/9/1/entrez SP - 40 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 51 Suppl N2 - Two hundred thirty patients with generalized anxiety and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) scores greater than or equal to 18 were subdivided at random, according to a double-blind design, into one group treated with 5-10 mg of oral buspirone t.i.d. or one group treated with 10-20 mg of oral oxazepam t.i.d. for 6 weeks. No anxiolytic treatment was allowed 3 months prior to trial entry. Analysis of demographic variables revealed no significant imbalance between the two treatment groups. Twenty patients were excluded from efficacy analysis because of treatment withdrawal before the first efficacy evaluation on Day 7. Another 4 patients were excluded because they were taking concomitant psychotropic medication. The remaining 206 patients displayed a decrease in HAM-A scores (mean +/- SD) from 23.9 +/- 4.1 to 10.6 +/- 7.7 in the buspirone group and from 23.9 +/- 4.2 to 11.5 +/- 8.0 in the oxazepam group. The two treatment groups were also found to be virtually identical in an "intent to treat" analysis of all 230 patients as well as in other ratings (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Raskin Depression Scale, Covi Anxiety Scale, Physicians Questionnaire, global ratings, and Hopkins Symptom Checklist [HSCL]-56). However, oxazepam was never superior to buspirone in any of the efficacy analyses. Of the 230 patients, 127 spontaneously reported adverse events, including drowsiness, dizziness, headache, nausea, and nervousness. Adverse events were relatively similar in the two groups. In conclusion, buspirone and oxazepam appear to be equally effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety encountered by general practitioners. This outcome, in addition to a previously documented absence of any dependency liability, makes buspirone a clinically important anxiolytic drug. SN - 0160-6689 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2211567/A_double_blind_controlled_trial_in_primary_care_patients_with_generalized_anxiety:_a_comparison_between_buspirone_and_oxazepam_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7698 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -