Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of dietary fat intakes with risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study.
Int J Cancer 2012; 131(6):1376-87IJ

Abstract

The aim of our study was to investigate whether intakes of total fat and fat subtypes were associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cardia or gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma. From 1995-1996, dietary intake data was reported by 494,978 participants of the NIH-AARP cohort. The 630 EAC, 215 ESCC, 454 gastric cardia and 501 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas accrued to the cohort. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between the dietary fat intakes, whilst adjusting for potential confounders. Although apparent associations were observed in energy-adjusted models, multivariate adjustment attenuated results to null [e.g., EAC energy adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.66 (1.27-2.18) p for trend <0.01; EAC multivariate adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.17 (0.84-1.64) p for trend = 0.58]. Similar patterns were also observed for fat subtypes [e.g., EAC saturated fat, energy adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.79 (1.37-2.33) p for trend <0.01; EAC saturated fat, multivariate adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.27 (0.91-1.78) p for trend = 0.28]. However, in multivariate models an inverse association for polyunsaturated fat (continuous) was seen for EAC in subjects with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range (18.5-<25 kg/m(2)) [HR (95% CI) 0.76 (0.63-0.92)], that was not present in overweight subjects [HR (95% CI) 1.04 (0.96-1.14)], or in unstratified analysis [HR (95% CI) 0.97 (0.90-1.05)]. p for interaction = 0.02. Overall, we found null associations between the dietary fat intakes with esophageal or gastric cancer risk; although a protective effect of polyunsaturated fat intake was seen for EAC in subjects with a normal BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Health Services Research Group, Centre for Public Health, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. m.odoherty@qub.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22116732

Citation

O'Doherty, Mark G., et al. "Association of Dietary Fat Intakes With Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 131, no. 6, 2012, pp. 1376-87.
O'Doherty MG, Freedman ND, Hollenbeck AR, et al. Association of dietary fat intakes with risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study. Int J Cancer. 2012;131(6):1376-87.
O'Doherty, M. G., Freedman, N. D., Hollenbeck, A. R., Schatzkin, A., Murray, L. J., Cantwell, M. M., & Abnet, C. C. (2012). Association of dietary fat intakes with risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study. International Journal of Cancer, 131(6), pp. 1376-87. doi:10.1002/ijc.27366.
O'Doherty MG, et al. Association of Dietary Fat Intakes With Risk of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Int J Cancer. 2012 Sep 15;131(6):1376-87. PubMed PMID: 22116732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of dietary fat intakes with risk of esophageal and gastric cancer in the NIH-AARP diet and health study. AU - O'Doherty,Mark G, AU - Freedman,Neal D, AU - Hollenbeck,Albert R, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Murray,Liam J, AU - Cantwell,Marie M, AU - Abnet,Christian C, Y1 - 2012/01/27/ PY - 2011/05/30/received PY - 2011/11/15/accepted PY - 2011/11/26/entrez PY - 2011/11/26/pubmed PY - 2013/3/12/medline SP - 1376 EP - 87 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 131 IS - 6 N2 - The aim of our study was to investigate whether intakes of total fat and fat subtypes were associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cardia or gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma. From 1995-1996, dietary intake data was reported by 494,978 participants of the NIH-AARP cohort. The 630 EAC, 215 ESCC, 454 gastric cardia and 501 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas accrued to the cohort. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between the dietary fat intakes, whilst adjusting for potential confounders. Although apparent associations were observed in energy-adjusted models, multivariate adjustment attenuated results to null [e.g., EAC energy adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.66 (1.27-2.18) p for trend <0.01; EAC multivariate adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.17 (0.84-1.64) p for trend = 0.58]. Similar patterns were also observed for fat subtypes [e.g., EAC saturated fat, energy adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.79 (1.37-2.33) p for trend <0.01; EAC saturated fat, multivariate adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.27 (0.91-1.78) p for trend = 0.28]. However, in multivariate models an inverse association for polyunsaturated fat (continuous) was seen for EAC in subjects with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range (18.5-<25 kg/m(2)) [HR (95% CI) 0.76 (0.63-0.92)], that was not present in overweight subjects [HR (95% CI) 1.04 (0.96-1.14)], or in unstratified analysis [HR (95% CI) 0.97 (0.90-1.05)]. p for interaction = 0.02. Overall, we found null associations between the dietary fat intakes with esophageal or gastric cancer risk; although a protective effect of polyunsaturated fat intake was seen for EAC in subjects with a normal BMI. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22116732/Association_of_dietary_fat_intakes_with_risk_of_esophageal_and_gastric_cancer_in_the_NIH_AARP_diet_and_health_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.27366 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -