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Directed migration of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a physiological direct current electric field.
Eur Cell Mater 2011; 22:344-58EC

Abstract

At sites of bone fracture, naturally-occurring electric fields (EFs) exist during healing and may guide cell migration. In this study, we investigated whether EFs could direct the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), which are known to be key players in bone formation. Human BM-MSCs were cultured in direct current EFs of 10 to 600 mV/mm. Using time-lapse microscopy, we demonstrated that an EF directed migration of BM-MSCs mainly to the anode. Directional migration occurred at a low threshold and with a physiological EF of ~25 mV/mm. Increasing the EF enhanced the MSC migratory response. The migration speed peaked at 300 mV/mm, at a rate of 42 ±1 µm/h, around double the control (no EF) migration rate. MSCs showed sustained response to prolonged EF application in vitro up to at least 8 h. The electrotaxis of MSCs with either early (P3-P5) or late (P7-P10) passage was also investigated. Migration was passage-dependent with higher passage number showing reduced directed migration, within the range of passages examined. An EF of 200 mV/mm for 2 h did not affect cell senescence, phenotype, or osteogenic potential of MSCs, regardless of passage number within the range tested (P3-P10). Our findings indicate that EFs are a powerful cue in directing migration of human MSCs in vitro. An applied EF may be useful to control or enhance migration of MSCs during bone healing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22125259

Citation

Zhao, Zhiqiang, et al. "Directed Migration of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Physiological Direct Current Electric Field." European Cells & Materials, vol. 22, 2011, pp. 344-58.
Zhao Z, Watt C, Karystinou A, et al. Directed migration of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a physiological direct current electric field. Eur Cell Mater. 2011;22:344-58.
Zhao, Z., Watt, C., Karystinou, A., Roelofs, A. J., McCaig, C. D., Gibson, I. R., & De Bari, C. (2011). Directed migration of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a physiological direct current electric field. European Cells & Materials, 22, pp. 344-58.
Zhao Z, et al. Directed Migration of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Physiological Direct Current Electric Field. Eur Cell Mater. 2011 Nov 29;22:344-58. PubMed PMID: 22125259.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Directed migration of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a physiological direct current electric field. AU - Zhao,Zhiqiang, AU - Watt,Carolyn, AU - Karystinou,Alexandra, AU - Roelofs,Anke J, AU - McCaig,Colin D, AU - Gibson,Iain R, AU - De Bari,Cosimo, Y1 - 2011/11/29/ PY - 2011/11/30/entrez PY - 2011/11/30/pubmed PY - 2012/3/8/medline SP - 344 EP - 58 JF - European cells & materials JO - Eur Cell Mater VL - 22 N2 - At sites of bone fracture, naturally-occurring electric fields (EFs) exist during healing and may guide cell migration. In this study, we investigated whether EFs could direct the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), which are known to be key players in bone formation. Human BM-MSCs were cultured in direct current EFs of 10 to 600 mV/mm. Using time-lapse microscopy, we demonstrated that an EF directed migration of BM-MSCs mainly to the anode. Directional migration occurred at a low threshold and with a physiological EF of ~25 mV/mm. Increasing the EF enhanced the MSC migratory response. The migration speed peaked at 300 mV/mm, at a rate of 42 ±1 µm/h, around double the control (no EF) migration rate. MSCs showed sustained response to prolonged EF application in vitro up to at least 8 h. The electrotaxis of MSCs with either early (P3-P5) or late (P7-P10) passage was also investigated. Migration was passage-dependent with higher passage number showing reduced directed migration, within the range of passages examined. An EF of 200 mV/mm for 2 h did not affect cell senescence, phenotype, or osteogenic potential of MSCs, regardless of passage number within the range tested (P3-P10). Our findings indicate that EFs are a powerful cue in directing migration of human MSCs in vitro. An applied EF may be useful to control or enhance migration of MSCs during bone healing. SN - 1473-2262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22125259/Directed_migration_of_human_bone_marrow_mesenchymal_stem_cells_in_a_physiological_direct_current_electric_field_ L2 - http://www.ecmjournal.org/papers/vol022/vol022a26.php DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -