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Lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats: 12 cases (2008-2009).
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Dec 15; 239(12):1574-9.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe clinical and physiologic changes during lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats and determine immediate surgical outcome.

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS

Client-owned dogs (n = 7) and cats (5).

PROCEDURES

A custom-made lift device was used to retract the abdominal wall for laparoscopic instrumentation. The lift device was used first in 3 dog cadavers to assess the risk of complications. Thereafter, the device was used for routine laparoscopic procedures in client-owned animals. Data collected from medical records included signalment, body weight, clinical signs, diagnosis, surgery type and duration, conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery, preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists score, mean intraoperative respiratory rate, mean and peak end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) during the laparoscopic surgery, ventilation method, mean saturation of hemoglobin with O(2), mean and systolic arterial pressures during the laparoscopic surgery, total anesthesia time, signs of pain immediately after recovery, duration of hospitalization, and postoperative complications.

RESULTS

Lift laparoscopy was successfully performed in 10 of the 12 patients. No adverse effects were noted with the use of this technique. However, in 1 dog and 1 cat, conversion to laparotomy was necessary because of poor visualization.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that lift laparoscopy is feasible in dogs and cats and is an option that can be used in clinical practice, especially if creation of positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum is not desirable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. bfransso@vetmed.wsu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22129121

Citation

Fransson, Boel A., and Claude A. Ragle. "Lift Laparoscopy in Dogs and Cats: 12 Cases (2008-2009)." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 239, no. 12, 2011, pp. 1574-9.
Fransson BA, Ragle CA. Lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats: 12 cases (2008-2009). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011;239(12):1574-9.
Fransson, B. A., & Ragle, C. A. (2011). Lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats: 12 cases (2008-2009). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 239(12), 1574-9. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.239.12.1574
Fransson BA, Ragle CA. Lift Laparoscopy in Dogs and Cats: 12 Cases (2008-2009). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2011 Dec 15;239(12):1574-9. PubMed PMID: 22129121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats: 12 cases (2008-2009). AU - Fransson,Boel A, AU - Ragle,Claude A, PY - 2011/12/2/entrez PY - 2011/12/2/pubmed PY - 2012/4/3/medline SP - 1574 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 239 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical and physiologic changes during lift laparoscopy in dogs and cats and determine immediate surgical outcome. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: Client-owned dogs (n = 7) and cats (5). PROCEDURES: A custom-made lift device was used to retract the abdominal wall for laparoscopic instrumentation. The lift device was used first in 3 dog cadavers to assess the risk of complications. Thereafter, the device was used for routine laparoscopic procedures in client-owned animals. Data collected from medical records included signalment, body weight, clinical signs, diagnosis, surgery type and duration, conversion from laparoscopic to open surgery, preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists score, mean intraoperative respiratory rate, mean and peak end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) during the laparoscopic surgery, ventilation method, mean saturation of hemoglobin with O(2), mean and systolic arterial pressures during the laparoscopic surgery, total anesthesia time, signs of pain immediately after recovery, duration of hospitalization, and postoperative complications. RESULTS: Lift laparoscopy was successfully performed in 10 of the 12 patients. No adverse effects were noted with the use of this technique. However, in 1 dog and 1 cat, conversion to laparotomy was necessary because of poor visualization. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that lift laparoscopy is feasible in dogs and cats and is an option that can be used in clinical practice, especially if creation of positive-pressure pneumoperitoneum is not desirable. SN - 1943-569X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22129121/Lift_laparoscopy_in_dogs_and_cats:_12_cases__2008_2009__ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/javma.239.12.1574?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -