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Total antioxidant capacity of diet and risk of stroke: a population-based prospective cohort of women.
Stroke 2012; 43(2):335-40S

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods may reduce the risk of stroke by inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) takes into account all antioxidants and the synergistic effects between them. We examined the association between dietary TAC and stroke incidence in cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free women and in women with CVD history at baseline.

METHODS

The study included women (31,035 CVD-free and 5680 with CVD history at baseline), aged 49 to 83 years, from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary TAC was calculated using oxygen radical absorbance capacity values. Stroke cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

RESULTS

During follow-up (September 1997 to December 2009), we identified 1322 stroke cases (988 cerebral infarctions, 226 hemorrhagic strokes, and 108 unspecified strokes) among CVD-free women and 1007 stroke cases (796 cerebral infarctions, 100 hemorrhagic strokes, and 111 unspecified strokes) among women with a CVD history. The multivariable hazard ratio of total stroke comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of dietary TAC was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-0.99; P for trend=0.04) in CVD-free women. Among women with a CVD history, the hazard ratios for the highest versus lowest quartile of TAC were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.75-1.07; P for trend=0.30) for total stroke and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.32-0.95; P for trend=0.03) for hemorrhagic stroke.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that dietary TAC is inversely associated with total stroke among CVD-free women and hemorrhagic stroke among women with CVD history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22135074

Citation

Rautiainen, Susanne, et al. "Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Stroke: a Population-based Prospective Cohort of Women." Stroke, vol. 43, no. 2, 2012, pp. 335-40.
Rautiainen S, Larsson S, Virtamo J, et al. Total antioxidant capacity of diet and risk of stroke: a population-based prospective cohort of women. Stroke. 2012;43(2):335-40.
Rautiainen, S., Larsson, S., Virtamo, J., & Wolk, A. (2012). Total antioxidant capacity of diet and risk of stroke: a population-based prospective cohort of women. Stroke, 43(2), pp. 335-40. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.635557.
Rautiainen S, et al. Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Stroke: a Population-based Prospective Cohort of Women. Stroke. 2012;43(2):335-40. PubMed PMID: 22135074.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total antioxidant capacity of diet and risk of stroke: a population-based prospective cohort of women. AU - Rautiainen,Susanne, AU - Larsson,Susanna, AU - Virtamo,Jarmo, AU - Wolk,Alicja, Y1 - 2011/12/01/ PY - 2011/12/3/entrez PY - 2011/12/3/pubmed PY - 2012/8/16/medline SP - 335 EP - 40 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods may reduce the risk of stroke by inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) takes into account all antioxidants and the synergistic effects between them. We examined the association between dietary TAC and stroke incidence in cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free women and in women with CVD history at baseline. METHODS: The study included women (31,035 CVD-free and 5680 with CVD history at baseline), aged 49 to 83 years, from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary TAC was calculated using oxygen radical absorbance capacity values. Stroke cases were ascertained by linkage with the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. RESULTS: During follow-up (September 1997 to December 2009), we identified 1322 stroke cases (988 cerebral infarctions, 226 hemorrhagic strokes, and 108 unspecified strokes) among CVD-free women and 1007 stroke cases (796 cerebral infarctions, 100 hemorrhagic strokes, and 111 unspecified strokes) among women with a CVD history. The multivariable hazard ratio of total stroke comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of dietary TAC was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.70-0.99; P for trend=0.04) in CVD-free women. Among women with a CVD history, the hazard ratios for the highest versus lowest quartile of TAC were 0.90 (95% CI, 0.75-1.07; P for trend=0.30) for total stroke and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.32-0.95; P for trend=0.03) for hemorrhagic stroke. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that dietary TAC is inversely associated with total stroke among CVD-free women and hemorrhagic stroke among women with CVD history. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22135074/Total_antioxidant_capacity_of_diet_and_risk_of_stroke:_a_population_based_prospective_cohort_of_women_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.635557?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -