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Gender moderates the relationship between emotion and perceived gaze.
Emotion. 2011 Dec; 11(6):1439-44.E

Abstract

Recent evidence shows that gender modulates the morphology of facial expressions and might thus alter the meaning of those expressions. Consequently, we hypothesized that gender would moderate the relationship between facial expressions and the perception of direct gaze. In Study 1, participants viewed male and female faces exhibiting joy, anger, fear, and neutral expressions displayed with direct and averted gazes. Perceptions of direct gaze were most likely for male faces expressing anger or joy and for female faces expressing joy. Study 2 established that these results were due to facial morphology and not to gender stereotypes. Thus, the morphology of male and female faces amplifies or constrains emotional signals and accordingly alters gaze perception.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Tufts University, USA. Michael.Slepian@tufts.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22142212

Citation

Slepian, Michael L., et al. "Gender Moderates the Relationship Between Emotion and Perceived Gaze." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 11, no. 6, 2011, pp. 1439-44.
Slepian ML, Weisbuch M, Adams RB, et al. Gender moderates the relationship between emotion and perceived gaze. Emotion. 2011;11(6):1439-44.
Slepian, M. L., Weisbuch, M., Adams, R. B., & Ambady, N. (2011). Gender moderates the relationship between emotion and perceived gaze. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 11(6), 1439-44. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0026163
Slepian ML, et al. Gender Moderates the Relationship Between Emotion and Perceived Gaze. Emotion. 2011;11(6):1439-44. PubMed PMID: 22142212.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender moderates the relationship between emotion and perceived gaze. AU - Slepian,Michael L, AU - Weisbuch,Max, AU - Adams,Reginald B, AU - Ambady,Nalini, PY - 2011/12/7/entrez PY - 2011/12/7/pubmed PY - 2012/4/14/medline SP - 1439 EP - 44 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - Recent evidence shows that gender modulates the morphology of facial expressions and might thus alter the meaning of those expressions. Consequently, we hypothesized that gender would moderate the relationship between facial expressions and the perception of direct gaze. In Study 1, participants viewed male and female faces exhibiting joy, anger, fear, and neutral expressions displayed with direct and averted gazes. Perceptions of direct gaze were most likely for male faces expressing anger or joy and for female faces expressing joy. Study 2 established that these results were due to facial morphology and not to gender stereotypes. Thus, the morphology of male and female faces amplifies or constrains emotional signals and accordingly alters gaze perception. SN - 1931-1516 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22142212/Gender_moderates_the_relationship_between_emotion_and_perceived_gaze_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/emo/11/6/1439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -