Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Anterior cervical myelomeningocele: a rare malformation of the spinal cord.
J Neurosurg Spine 2012; 16(3):257-60JN

Abstract

Cervical myelomeningocele (MMC) is an uncommon congenital malformation of the spinal cord and accounts for a small proportion of neural tube defects. These lesions mostly occur in the dorsal part of the body. Only a single case of an anterior cervical MMC has been previously reported. The authors report a second case of anterior cervical MMC diagnosed when the patient began to experience symptoms of bilateral hand weakness in adulthood. In this patient, MR imaging of the cervical spine showed an anterior cervical MMC at the C6-7 level with hydrocephalus, thinning of the genu and trunk of the corpus callosum, maldevelopment of the cerebellar tonsils, and expansion of the fourth ventricle, posterior cranial fossa, and subarachnoid space. A CT scan and a 3D CT reconstruction of the cervical spine clearly demonstrated contiguous fusions of multiple lower-cervical vertebrae and neural arches, which was consistent with Type III Klippel-Feil syndrome. The patient was advised to undergo operative treatment to prevent the progression of her neurological deficit. However, after being notified of the potential neurological risks, the patient declined surgery and opted for conservative treatment with a hard neck collar. At 4 months' follow-up, the patient's neurological deficit remains stable with the MMC left untreated. The authors presume that the possible pathogenesis of anterior cervical MMC may greatly differ from that of posterior lesions. This lesion could also be associated with multiple other spinal abnormalities, which highlights the importance of comprehensive preoperative radiological examinations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Spine Surgery, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22150240

Citation

Jiang, Jun, et al. "Anterior Cervical Myelomeningocele: a Rare Malformation of the Spinal Cord." Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine, vol. 16, no. 3, 2012, pp. 257-60.
Jiang J, Zhu Z, Qian B, et al. Anterior cervical myelomeningocele: a rare malformation of the spinal cord. J Neurosurg Spine. 2012;16(3):257-60.
Jiang, J., Zhu, Z., Qian, B., Liu, Z., & Qiu, Y. (2012). Anterior cervical myelomeningocele: a rare malformation of the spinal cord. Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine, 16(3), pp. 257-60. doi:10.3171/2011.10.SPINE11484.
Jiang J, et al. Anterior Cervical Myelomeningocele: a Rare Malformation of the Spinal Cord. J Neurosurg Spine. 2012;16(3):257-60. PubMed PMID: 22150240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anterior cervical myelomeningocele: a rare malformation of the spinal cord. AU - Jiang,Jun, AU - Zhu,Zezhang, AU - Qian,Bangping, AU - Liu,Zhen, AU - Qiu,Yong, Y1 - 2011/12/09/ PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/4/28/medline SP - 257 EP - 60 JF - Journal of neurosurgery. Spine JO - J Neurosurg Spine VL - 16 IS - 3 N2 - Cervical myelomeningocele (MMC) is an uncommon congenital malformation of the spinal cord and accounts for a small proportion of neural tube defects. These lesions mostly occur in the dorsal part of the body. Only a single case of an anterior cervical MMC has been previously reported. The authors report a second case of anterior cervical MMC diagnosed when the patient began to experience symptoms of bilateral hand weakness in adulthood. In this patient, MR imaging of the cervical spine showed an anterior cervical MMC at the C6-7 level with hydrocephalus, thinning of the genu and trunk of the corpus callosum, maldevelopment of the cerebellar tonsils, and expansion of the fourth ventricle, posterior cranial fossa, and subarachnoid space. A CT scan and a 3D CT reconstruction of the cervical spine clearly demonstrated contiguous fusions of multiple lower-cervical vertebrae and neural arches, which was consistent with Type III Klippel-Feil syndrome. The patient was advised to undergo operative treatment to prevent the progression of her neurological deficit. However, after being notified of the potential neurological risks, the patient declined surgery and opted for conservative treatment with a hard neck collar. At 4 months' follow-up, the patient's neurological deficit remains stable with the MMC left untreated. The authors presume that the possible pathogenesis of anterior cervical MMC may greatly differ from that of posterior lesions. This lesion could also be associated with multiple other spinal abnormalities, which highlights the importance of comprehensive preoperative radiological examinations. SN - 1547-5646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22150240/Anterior_cervical_myelomeningocele:_a_rare_malformation_of_the_spinal_cord_ L2 - https://thejns.org/doi/10.3171/2011.10.SPINE11484 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -