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The impact of sleep quality on cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2012 Jan; 18(1):108-17.JI

Abstract

In healthy individuals and those with insomnia, poor sleep quality is associated with decrements in performance on tests of cognition, especially executive function. Sleep disturbances and cognitive deficits are both prevalent in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sleep problems occur in over 75% of patients, with sleep fragmentation and decreased sleep efficiency being the most common sleep complaints, but their relation to cognition is unknown. We examined the association between sleep quality and cognition in PD. In 35 non-demented individuals with PD and 18 normal control adults (NC), sleep was measured using 24-hr wrist actigraphy over 7 days. Cognitive domains tested included attention and executive function, memory and psychomotor function. In both groups, poor sleep was associated with worse performance on tests of attention/executive function but not memory or psychomotor function. In the PD group, attention/executive function was predicted by sleep efficiency, whereas memory and psychomotor function were not predicted by sleep quality. Psychomotor and memory function were predicted by motor symptom severity. This study is the first to demonstrate that sleep quality in PD is significantly correlated with cognition and that it differentially impacts attention and executive function, thereby furthering our understanding of the link between sleep and cognition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22152279

Citation

Stavitsky, Karina, et al. "The Impact of Sleep Quality On Cognitive Functioning in Parkinson's Disease." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 18, no. 1, 2012, pp. 108-17.
Stavitsky K, Neargarder S, Bogdanova Y, et al. The impact of sleep quality on cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2012;18(1):108-17.
Stavitsky, K., Neargarder, S., Bogdanova, Y., McNamara, P., & Cronin-Golomb, A. (2012). The impact of sleep quality on cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, 18(1), 108-17. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617711001482
Stavitsky K, et al. The Impact of Sleep Quality On Cognitive Functioning in Parkinson's Disease. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2012;18(1):108-17. PubMed PMID: 22152279.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of sleep quality on cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease. AU - Stavitsky,Karina, AU - Neargarder,Sandy, AU - Bogdanova,Yelena, AU - McNamara,Patrick, AU - Cronin-Golomb,Alice, Y1 - 2011/12/09/ PY - 2011/12/14/entrez PY - 2011/12/14/pubmed PY - 2012/4/28/medline SP - 108 EP - 17 JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS JO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - In healthy individuals and those with insomnia, poor sleep quality is associated with decrements in performance on tests of cognition, especially executive function. Sleep disturbances and cognitive deficits are both prevalent in Parkinson's disease (PD). Sleep problems occur in over 75% of patients, with sleep fragmentation and decreased sleep efficiency being the most common sleep complaints, but their relation to cognition is unknown. We examined the association between sleep quality and cognition in PD. In 35 non-demented individuals with PD and 18 normal control adults (NC), sleep was measured using 24-hr wrist actigraphy over 7 days. Cognitive domains tested included attention and executive function, memory and psychomotor function. In both groups, poor sleep was associated with worse performance on tests of attention/executive function but not memory or psychomotor function. In the PD group, attention/executive function was predicted by sleep efficiency, whereas memory and psychomotor function were not predicted by sleep quality. Psychomotor and memory function were predicted by motor symptom severity. This study is the first to demonstrate that sleep quality in PD is significantly correlated with cognition and that it differentially impacts attention and executive function, thereby furthering our understanding of the link between sleep and cognition. SN - 1469-7661 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22152279/The_impact_of_sleep_quality_on_cognitive_functioning_in_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1355617711001482/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -